Thomas Henry Huxley

Standard Name: Huxley, Thomas Henry
Used Form: T. H. Huxley

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Cultural formation Evelyn Sharp
Trained at home in prayers learned by heart, with some scope for improvising, and given a religious grounding in Anglican ism at school,
Sharp, Evelyn. Unfinished Adventure. John Lane, Bodley Head, 1933.
33, 37-8
ES realised that she was not an irreligious person only...
Education H. G. Wells
Having initially left school at thirteen, HGW later attended the Normal School which later became the Royal College of Science. His most important teacher and inspiration was Thomas Huxley . He failed his final exams...
Family and Intimate relationships Dinah Mulock Craik
George Lillie Craik became (following his marriage to Dinah Mulock and possibly as a result of his connection with her) a partner in the Macmillan publishing firm .
Mitchell, Sally. Dinah Mulock Craik. Twayne, 1983.
15
The marriage apparently proved happy. The...
Family and Intimate relationships Katharine Bruce Glasier
John Bruce Glasier, also a founding member of the Independent Labour Party and NAC , was a devoted socialist like KBG , an aspiring poet, a determined agnostic, and at the end of his life...
Family and Intimate relationships Aldous Huxley
AH 's paternal grandfather, Thomas Henry Huxley , was a famous biologist who died just a year after his grandson's birth. When he was six Aldous attended, with his entire family, the unveiling of a...
Friends, Associates Frances Power Cobbe
FPC 's wide London circle included Walter Bagehot , Frances Sarah Colenso and her husband Bishop Colenso (while they were home from Africa), Henry Fawcett , Charles Kingsley , W. E. H. Lecky , Sir Charles Lyell
Friends, Associates Anna Swanwick
Friends, Associates Emily Shirreff
ES 's circle of friends included Sir William Grove (inventor of the Grove battery), scientist Mary Somerville , lawyer and Royal Society president Lord Wrottesley , astronomer Sir George Biddell Airy , Sir John Herschel
Friends, Associates Maria Grey
The Shirreffs were a sociable family whose friends and acquaintances were varied. The scientist Mary Somerville , geologist Sir Charles Lyell , and Sir William Grove , inventor of the Grove battery, were numbered among...
Friends, Associates Geraldine Jewsbury
GJ entered the social scene of the capital with several connections already made. Her London friends included members of the Kingsley and Rossetti families, feminist reformer Frances Power Cobbe , author John Ruskin , Samuel Carter
Literary responses George Henry Lewes
A hostile notice by T. H. Huxley in the Westminster Review (owned by John Chapman ) dismissed Lewes as an amateur and ranked his book below Harriet Martineau 's recent abridgement of Comte. George Eliot
politics Emily Davies
ED 's petition was a request for funding to establish a College for women. It was signed by 521 teachers of girls and 175 others, including Robert Browning , George Grote , Thomas Huxley ,...
politics Emily Faithfull
EF reluctantly declined to stand for the London School Board , following the resignation of T. H. Huxley , because of her commitments to other activities.
Stone, James S. Emily Faithfull: Victorian Champion of Women’s Rights. P. D. Meany, 1994.
284
politics Sophia Jex-Blake
She aimed to establish credibility for a female medical college by gathering an impressive group of physicians. They included the editor of the British Medical Journal, Ernest Hart , Thomas Henry Huxley , Dr...
Reception Dinah Mulock Craik
Following her death, a committee which included Tennyson , Arnold , Robert Browning , Margaret Oliphant , T. H. Huxley , and James Russell Lowell was formed to devise a memorial to DMC in Tewkesbury...

Timeline

4 May 1825
The writer Thomas Henry Huxley was born in Ealing.
1851
The first nationally funded institutions for scientific education, the School of Mines and the Museum of Practical Geology , were established.
1856
Richard Owen , a rival of Darwin and Huxley , was appointed superintendent of the natural history departments of the British Museum .
Spring1859
Papers announcing geologists' new evolutionary arguments for human antiquity appeared, scant months before Darwin 's Origin of Species was published.
During the 1860s
Henry Maudsley read works by T. H. Huxley which affected his theories of psychology.
30 June 1860
T. H. Huxley and Bishop Samuel Wilberforce clashed over evolution at the annual meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science at Oxford.
January 1863
Thomas Henry Huxley , scientist, educator, and public administrator, published Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature.
1864-1867
The Reader, a weekly Review of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Roos, David A. “The Aims and Intentions of Nature”. Victorian Science and Victorian Values: Literary Perspectives, edited by James Paradis and Thomas Postlewait, New York Academy of Sciences, 1981, pp. 159 - 80.
163
appeared.
7 October 1865
Governor Edward Eyre ruthlessly suppressed a rebellion which began at Morant Bay in Jamaica.
1869
T. H. Huxley coined the word agnostic.
1872
T. H. Huxley and other members of the Physics, Chemistry, and Natural History departments of the School of Mines split from the School and relocated in new buildings in South Kensington.
1872-1876
The HMS Challenger, under the scientific direction of Charles Wyville Thomson , sailed around the world in order to sound and dredge in three great ocean basins, to collect all possible flora and fauna at...
24 May 1875
In the wake of proposed legislation both by antivivisectionists and by scientists in favour of animal experiments, Home Secretary Richard Cross announced a Royal Commission on animal vivisection.
1876
T. H. Huxley praised the new term biology as an improvement over the former term, Natural History, which he called old . . .[and] confusing because it conveyed so many meanings.
Merrill, Lynn L. The Romance of Victorian Natural History. Oxford University Press, 1989.
14
1 October 1880
Mason College or Mason Science College in Birmingham, founded at a cost of more than £200,000 by Sir Josiah Mason , who had made his fortune out of nibs for pens, opened its doors to students.