James Martineau

Standard Name: Martineau, James

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Anthologization Anne Steele
Reprints and anthologies since this edition have maintained AS 's place in the American hymn tradition; the biographical material accompanying them has spread the impression of her as an exaggeratedly pious ideal. Editions include Hymns...
Anthologization Anna Letitia Waring
Many of ALW 's hymns appeared in popular hymnbooks, which was extremely beneficial to her reputation. These books include the Leeds Hymn Book in 1853, the American Unitarian Hymn Book for Church and Home in...
Cultural formation Julia Wedgwood
JW was born into that section of the English professional class which functioned as an intellectual and cultural elite. She was connected through her family with other Victorians strongly committed to spiritual and moral inquiry...
Cultural formation Julia Wedgwood
Her parents were connected to the Unitarian tradition descending in the family from Josiah Wedgwood as well as to the largely Anglican evangelical and philanthropic Clapham Sect centred close to their home in South London...
Cultural formation Anna Swanwick
She was born into a business family in that great and busy port, and brought up a Liberal and a Unitarian . In 1831 James Martineau became the Minister at the chapel in Paradise Street...
Cultural formation Harriet Martineau
The English Martineaus came from French Huguenot stock: the first member of the family (according to HM herself) had settled in Norwich in 1688. She made a point, in a correction to the information provided...
Dedications Anna Swanwick
She dedicated it to James Martineau in honour of their friendship of sixty years.
Swanwick, Anna. Poets the Interpreters of their Age. George Bell, 1892.
prelims
Her preface says: To the learned I have nothing to offer, but hopes to appeal to students and readers. She...
Education Julia Wedgwood
Her parents were active in the founding of Queen's College in May 1848. There and at Bedford College , JW attended lectures by F. D. Maurice and Francis Newman . James Martineau was also an influence.
Herford, Charles Harold, and Julia Wedgwood. “Frances Julia Wedgwood: A Memoir by the Editor”. The Personal Life of Josiah Wedgwood the Potter, Macmillan, 1915, p. xi - xxx.
xv-xvi
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Family and Intimate relationships Harriet Martineau
After her brother James 's hostile review of Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and DevelopmentHM broke off all communication with him. She does not refer to this directly in her Autobiography.
Martineau, Harriet. “Introduction and Editorial Materials”. Selected Letters, edited by Valerie Sanders, Clarendon Press, 1990, pp. vii - xxxiii, 235.
xxx
Family and Intimate relationships Harriet Martineau
Harriet was closest to her younger brother James , whose arrival she remembered with great clarity though she was less than three years old at the time. These two were frequently bullied by older siblings....
Friends, Associates Frances Power Cobbe
By this point in her life she was corresponding regularly with Frank Newman (younger brother of Cardinal Newman and of Harriett Mozley , who was an agnostic for most of his life). James Martineau ...
Friends, Associates Frances Power Cobbe
Friends, Associates Anna Swanwick
AS 's circle of friends (very largely brought her by her translations) included Henry Crabb Robinson , Tennyson , Robert Browning (who told her he wished she had known his wife), James Martineau (brother of...
Health Harriet Martineau
She had a difficult journey home. Her brother James accompanied her, and several friends—Julia Smith (also an abolitionist and the aunt of Florence Nightingale ), who had been her travelling companion along with her...
Instructor Anna Swanwick
AS began attending lectures given by James Martineau in Liverpool on Mental and Moral Philosophy.
Bruce, Mary Louisa. Anna Swanwick, A Memoir and Recollections 1813-1899. T. F. Unwin, 1903.
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Timeline

1 February 1845
The first issue of the Prospective Review: A Quarterly Journal of Theology and Literature was published.
July 1855
The first issue of the National Review was published; it became the most celebrated Unitarian periodical and one of the most illustrious quarterlies of the century.
21 April 1869
The Metaphysical Society was founded; women were excluded.