Charlotte Brontë

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Standard Name: Brontë, Charlotte
Birth Name: Charlotte Brontë
Married Name: Mrs Arthur Bell Nicholls
Pseudonym: Currer Bell
Used Form: Charlotte Bronte
CB 's five novels, with their passionate explorations of the dilemmas facing nineteenth-century middle-class English women, have made her perhaps the most loved, imitated, resisted, and hotly debated novelist of the Victorian period.
Etching of Charlotte Brontë after a portrait by George Richmond, 1850. She is seen from the waist up, seated, with one elbow resting on a table, that hand holding a small book and the other on her lap, holding a handkerchief. She wears a flat ribbon round her neck, and a dark dress, buttoned in front, with lace trim on the sleeves and bodice. Her dark, smooth hair is pulled back and tied with a dark ribbon.
"Charlotte Brontë, etching, after 1850" Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Charlotte_Bront%C3%AB#/media/File:Charlotte_Bront%C3%AB.jpg. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication license. This work is in the public domain.

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Literary responses Julia Kavanagh
H. F. Chorley , the Athenæum reviewer, lauded it as an excellent story for young people, sound in morals and pleasant in incident,—with only one passing apparition of the Deus ex machina to disturb our...
Literary responses Julia Kavanagh
On 22 November 1848, Charlotte Brontë wrote to William Smith Williams (a friend of both herself and the author), I have read Madeleine. It is a fine pearl in simple setting. Julia Kavanagh has...
Literary responses Harriet Martineau
The novel prompted a complimentary letter on 7 November 1849 from Currer Bell (Charlotte Brontë ) saying that in it he tasted a new and keen pleasure, and experienced a genuine benefit. In his...
Literary responses Patricia Highsmith
Critic Bob Wake discusses Highsmith's complex point-of-view techniques—a literary style begun by Henry James —and her modelling The Talented Mr Ripley on his novel The Ambassadors (1903). He notes her humorous plays on the James...
Literary responses Anne Brontë
On 4 July 1846 two anonymous reviews of Poems by Currer , Ellis and Acton Bell appeared, one mildly positive by Sydney Dobell in the Athenæum, and one enthusiastic in the Critic. A...
Literary responses Elizabeth Gaskell
EG called this work simply a little country love story,
Uglow, Jennifer S. Elizabeth Gaskell: A Habit of Stories. Faber and Faber, 1993.
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although it climaxes with a fire and a shipwreck. Charlotte Brontë liked it, and Mary Forster recorded her brother Matthew Arnold 's enjoyment of...
Literary responses Anne Mozley
George Eliot not only praised this review in a letter, but also instructed her publisher to send a copy of her next novel, The Mill on the Floss, to Bentley's expressly so that it...
Literary responses Rebecca Harding Davis
The book was initially well-received. A reviewer for the mostly female-oriented Peterson's Magazine, for instance, declared that [o]n some of the deepest problems that agitate humanity [RHD ] has evidently thought much and...
Literary responses Julia Kavanagh
Nathalie was praised by JK 's fellow novelist Katharine S. Macquoid .
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Charlotte Brontë , meanwhile, became an avowed admirer of the novel. On 21 January 1851 she wrote JK : Do not expect me...
Literary responses Elizabeth Gaskell
Around the time of Ruth's appearance, Swedish novelist and feminist Fredrika Bremer (who was probably introduced to EG by William and Mary Howitt ) wrote: Dear Elizabeth, dear sister in spirit, if I may...
Literary responses Jessie Fothergill
The Spectator reviewer admitted to surprise at this novel, since whereas The First Violin and Probation were clever and interesting, it found little, if anything, in them to lead us to expect that their author...
Literary responses Elizabeth Gaskell
Most reviews of North and South were positive, athough some criticized EG for what they saw as inaccuracies in her portrayal of northern industrial life. Chorley in the Athenæum called this one of the best...
Literary responses Matilda Betham-Edwards
Geraldine Jewsbury , reviewing this book for the Athenæum early the next year, was not exactly encouraging. She guessed the author's gender correctly, and judged the novel a pale imitation of Charlotte Brontë 's Jane...
Literary responses Julia Kavanagh
This novel was not as successful as JK 's earlier efforts. Charlotte Brontë confided to William Smith Williams , I have tried to read Daisy Burns; at the close of the 1st Vol. I...
Literary responses Anne Brontë
The novel was reviewed immediately by The Spectator and the Athenæum. The former accused the author of a morbid love for the coarse, not to say the brutal, and objected to the coarseness of...

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