Edward Copeland

Standard Name: Copeland, Edward

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Intertextuality and Influence Catherine Gore
She quotes Byron on the title-page.
Gore, Catherine. Cecil; or, The Adventures of a Coxcomb. R. Bentley.
title-page
As the Edinburgh Review noticed, Cecil's launching as a coxcomb takes place in 1809, the year that Byron began writing Childe Harold, and his final moral awakening...
Literary responses Catherine Gore
The Westminster Review said this novel was in itself a London Directory,
Vargo, Lisa. “<span data-tei-ns-tag="tei_title" data-tei-title-lvl=‘m’>Lodore</span> and the ’Novel of Society’”. Women’s Writing, Vol.
6
, No. 3, pp. 425-40.
435
which could have brought its author sponsorship from shopkeepers mentioned, and ought in turn to pay advertising tax.
Vargo, Lisa. “<span data-tei-ns-tag="tei_title" data-tei-title-lvl=‘m’>Lodore</span> and the ’Novel of Society’”. Women’s Writing, Vol.
6
, No. 3, pp. 425-40.
435
Thackeray picked...
Literary responses Catherine Gore
Edward Copeland has written that this novel catches the intense social anxiety that surrounded the passage of the Reform Bill, as La Silvestra defiantly overleaps the boundaries of class, and effortlessly deceives a bunch of...
Literary responses Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington
Edward Copeland writes that this novel combines aristocratic gossip, mistaken identities and gross newspaper falsifications that drive its plot for three volumes of romantic confusions.
Copeland, Edward. The Silver Fork Novel. Cambridge University Press.
178
Literary responses Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington
The London Court Journal and the London Literary Gazette agreed that this novel was even better than MB's Elderly Gentleman. The latter ascribed this to the niceties of feminine perception: the workings of the...
Literary responses Catherine Gore
Edward Copeland calls this Gore's most serious and ambitious novel, one that attempts the same social and historical reach as Thackeray 's Vanity Fair, as well as a self-conscious valediction to the silver fork novel.
Copeland, Edward. The Silver Fork Novel. Cambridge University Press.
209
Literary responses Lady Charlotte Bury
Edward Copeland argues that this text, though designed to ride the wave of the new silver-fork novel, draws its influences from an earlier generation: Frances Burney , Susan Ferrier , and Richardson 's Sir Charles...
Literary responses Lady Charlotte Bury
Edward Copeland finds most interesting in these novellas the attention to money-earning, and the way the young people (morally so much preferable to their elders, whether aristocratic or rich bourgeois) are helped out by servants...
Literary responses Lady Charlotte Bury
Edward Copeland thinks that this is the most challenging of LCB 's novels because of the complex interrelationship, in Delamere, between aristocratic pastimes, the arts, and the Whig aristocracy. He sees the amateur theatricals as...
Literary responses Elizabeth Meeke
Literary historian Edward Copeland points out that the hero and the Wheelers are opposites in their relation to money, and also that Mrs Wheeler's death (in hospital of injuries received from falling downstairs while drunk)...
Literary Setting Eliza Parsons
This novel is part-epistolary (all the letters being in continuation from the Scottish Anna Sidney—who later becomes Lady Kilmorney—to her older friend Mrs Grenville), partly in dialogue, partly in the form of Anna's journal, and...
politics Lady Charlotte Bury
Edward Copeland remarks that her testimony in court, though damaging to her reputation in society, established her as a strong, public Whig proponent for the rest of her life.
Copeland, Edward. The Silver Fork Novel. Cambridge University Press.
184
Reception Catherine Gore
George IV is supposed to have called this the best bred and most amusing novel published in his remembrance.
Stephen, Sir Leslie, and Sidney Lee, editors. The Dictionary of National Biography. Smith, Elder.
The Edinburgh Review judged it a respectable specimen
Baird, Rebecca Lynne Russell. Catherine Frances Gore, the Silver-Fork School, and "Mothers and Daughters": True Views of Society in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain. University of Arkansas.
114
of the genre of fashionable novel, and...
Reception Catherine Gore
Charlotte Brontë wrote to CG to voice her admiration: not the echo of another mind—the pale reflection of a reflection—but the result of original observation, and faithful delineation from actual life.
Mudge, Bradford Keyes, editor. Dictionary of Literary Biography 116. Gale Research.
129
Edward Copeland finds...
Reception Catherine Gore
Mrs. Armytage; or, Female Domination was received by the Athenæum as a clever work, as everything which comes from the pen of Mrs. Gore must be.
Athenæum. J. Lection.
454 (1836): 482
The reviewer, however, criticised its depiction...

Timeline

9 December 1826: The Literary Gazette printed a Key to Marianne...

Women writers item

9 December 1826

The Literary Gazette printed a Key to Marianne Spencer Hudson 's silver-fork novel, Almack's (titled after the well-known elite gentlemen's club of the same name), which had already reached its second edition this year. The...

Texts

Le Faye, Deirdre. “Chronology of Jane Austen’s Life”. The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen, edited by Edward Copeland and Juliet McMaster, Cambridge University Press, 1997, pp. 1-11.
Lewis, Jayne Elizabeth. “Clarissa’s Cruelty: Modern Fables of Moral Authority in <span data-tei-ns-tag="tei_title" data-tei-title-lvl=‘m’>The History of a Young Lady</span&gt”;. Clarissa and Her Readers: New Essays for the Clarissa Project, edited by Carol Houlihan Flynn and Edward Copeland, AMS Press, 1999, pp. 45-67.
Perry, Ruth. “Clarissa’s Daughters, or The History of Innocence Betrayed. How Women Writers Rewrote Richardson”. Clarissa and Her Readers: New Essays for the Clarissa Project, edited by Carol Houlihan Flynn and Edward Copeland, AMS Press, 1999, pp. 119-41.
McMaster, Juliet. “Class”. The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen, edited by Edward Copeland and Juliet McMaster, Cambridge University Press, 1997, pp. 115-30.
Copeland, Edward. “Defoe and the London Wall: Mapped Perspectives”. Eighteenth-Century Fiction, Vol.
10
, No. 4, pp. 407-28.
Schwarz, Joan I. “Eighteenth-Century Abduction Law and Clarissa”. Clarissa and Her Readers, edited by Carol Houlihan Flynn and Edward Copeland, AMS Press, 1999, pp. 269-08.
Fergus, Jan. “The Professional Woman Writer”. The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen, edited by Edward Copeland and Juliet McMaster, Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Copeland, Edward. The Silver Fork Novel. Cambridge University Press, 2012.
Copeland, Edward. “Virgin Sacrifice: Elizabeth Bennet <span data-tei-ns-tag="">After</span> Jane Austen”. Persuasions, Vol.
22
, pp. 156-74.
Copeland, Edward. Women Writing about Money: Women’s Fiction in England, 1790-1820. Cambridge University Press, 1995.