George Gordon, sixth Baron Byron

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Standard Name: Byron, George Gordon,,, sixth Baron
Used Form: Lord Byron

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Intertextuality and Influence George Paston
Though this novel shares some terrain with Gissing 's New Grub Street, critic Margaret Stetz finds that the two have little in common, since they take aim at very different aspects of the contemporary...
Intertextuality and Influence Mary Sewell
MS wrote mainly in verse for a working-class audience with the intent of instilling moral virtues in her readers. She believed that children memorize poetry easily, and that their imaginations are cultivated and their intellects...
Intertextuality and Influence Susanna Blamire
Scholars have debated whether The Nun's Return to the World may have been seen by Byron , and have influenced his poem The Prisoner of Chillon, published in June 1816. Since the eldest child...
Intertextuality and Influence Mary Ann Kelty
The book bears in various details the influence of Jane Austen , though its overall project of pious didacticism is at odds with Austen's approach. The title-page quotes Rousseau on the topic of the sensitive...
Intertextuality and Influence Sarah Wentworth Morton
The title-page quotes romantic, melancholy lines from Byron 's Childe Harold.
Bottorff, William K., and Sarah Wentworth Morton. “Introduction”. My Mind and its Thoughts, Scholars’ Facsimiles and Reprints, 1975, pp. 5 - 16.
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An Apology closing the volume speaks of SWM 's disappointments and distresses (which are often mentioned, though unspecified, in her work) especially...
Intertextuality and Influence Mary Elizabeth Braddon
MEB was encouraged to write from an early age, particularly by her mother. She would later recall how when she was eight and had just learned to write, her godfather bought her a beautiful brand...
Intertextuality and Influence Antonia Fraser
For readers familiar with the Shakespeare comedy (as Jemima certainly is), parallels are discernible between the personages and situations on stage and those of the actual world—parallels which are unsettling rather than helpful for Jemima...
Intertextuality and Influence Harriet Lee
This tale reached its fifth edition independently of the other Tales in 1823, when it appeared as a kind of trailer to John Murray 's projected edition of the whole series. Byron recognised Kruitzner as...
Intertextuality and Influence Louisa Anne Meredith
Most of the section called Poems, as well as some other pieces, describe flowers or other features of the natural world. Nature and poetry (which is celebrated in the opening Invocation to Song)...
Intertextuality and Influence Florence Dixie
The poem describes the pilgrimage abroad in which the child-author had followed in the footsteps of her dead mountaineer brother.
Dixie, Florence. Waifs and Strays. Griffith, Farran, Okeden and Welsh, 1884.
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His death, however, does not loom large in the poem, which combines musing with...
Intertextuality and Influence Elizabeth Ham
EH writes without overall construction, jumping from one topic and one anecdote to another. By this means, however, she captures both the inconsequential flavour of a life lived without overall plan and at the whim...
Intertextuality and Influence Marie Corelli
Ziska is openly critical of the writings of Zola , while praising those of Lord Byron . It also condemns the hypocrisy and destruction of Western imperialism at the fin de siècle: We take possession...
Intertextuality and Influence Barbara Hofland
The title-page quotes from Spenser , and the first chapter from Johnson 's Rambler. This sophisticated novel, with a North Yorkshire setting, a large cast of upper-class characters, and a wide range of reference...
Intertextuality and Influence Emily Brontë
Despite the slightness of her oeuvre and Wuthering Heights's initial lack of popularity, EB emerged early as a major influence on other writers. Matthew Arnold paid early tribute by comparing her to Byron in...
Intertextuality and Influence Barbara Pym
BP began this novel as a story about Hilary and me as spinsters of fiftyish—that is, about a then unimaginable future. Its dry humour and irony, its concentration on middle-aged spinsters, clergy, and the...

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