Émile Zola

Standard Name: Zola, Émile
Used Form: Emile Zola

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Education Colette
Colette wrote later of the way that a free and solitary childhood and adolescence, with plenty of opportunity to develop self-awareness and without any pressure to self-expression, had shaped her mind before the compulsion to...
Education Phyllis Bottome
Because PB was so interested in her French classes, her mother permitted Mellie to instruct her at their home. Despite their friendship, there was one matter on which Mellie and Phyllis could not agree—the Dreyfus
Education Mary Elizabeth Braddon
She knew France and the French language well. Not only did she use France as a setting and French literature as a resource for plots, and subscribe to Rolandi 's French circulating library, but she...
Friends, Associates Henry James
In Paris his friend Ivan Turgenev introduced him to Maupassant , Zola , and Daudet , among others.
Stringer, Jenny, editor. The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English. Oxford University Press, 1996.
Gale, Robert L. A Henry James Encyclopedia. Greenwood, 1989.
xx
Intertextuality and Influence Marie Corelli
Ziska is openly critical of the writings of Zola , while praising those of Lord Byron . It also condemns the hypocrisy and destruction of Western imperialism at the fin de siècle: We take possession...
Intertextuality and Influence Olive Schreiner
OS 's belated preface explains her anti-realist method, directed against the influence of Zola and Tolstoy , whose predictability she disliked. Here nothing can be prophesied. There is a strange coming and going of feet...
Intertextuality and Influence Flora Shaw
FS devotes a great deal of space to mining operations and to relations between the Dutch and the English settlers. After briefly describing the underground part of the De Beers Company diamond mines in Kimberley...
Intertextuality and Influence Margaret Drabble
Imagery of postpartum fluidity, particularly lactation, characterizes the lovers' growing passion and the descriptions of female sexual desire and orgasm. The narrative alternates between a schizoid third-person dialogue
Drabble, Margaret. The Waterfall. Penguin, 1971.
130
and first-person narration as Jane attempts...
Intertextuality and Influence Phyllis Bottome
By borrowing the title of Émile Zola 's J'accuse, published on 13 January 1898 to uncover the conspiracy against Alfred Dreyfus , PB invoked both the long history of European anti-semitism, and the occasional...
Intertextuality and Influence Sarah Grand
She again set her novel in her fictionalised version of Norwich, Morningquest. Of its three heroines, Angelica makes a moderately successful, though unconventional marriage to a man twenty years her senior to whom she...
Intertextuality and Influence Mary Elizabeth Braddon
The antecedents of Braddon's work were both print and stage melodrama, and as her career progressed her work increasingly reflected the influence of French realists and naturalists: Flaubert , Balzac , and Zola .
Wolff, Robert Lee. Sensational Victorian. Garland, 1979.
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Intertextuality and Influence Margaret Legge
When her mother dies leaving her some money, Janet writes to her husband (who still idolises her, but looks down upon her from a mental height and explains things in the simplest possible way, with...
Intertextuality and Influence Lucas Malet
Though ML was familiar with the canonical English Victorian novelists (and, less usually, with Samuel Richardson 's Sir Charles Grandison, to whose great length she alludes with approval), those writers she acknowledged as influences...
Literary responses Kathleen Caffyn
While this novel enjoyed popular acclaim, it also attracted severe criticism. It was derided by reviewers in the Bookman, the Critic, and the Nation. The Critic reviewer ignored Gwen's final return to...
Literary responses Victoria Cross
Contemporary reviews of Anna Lombard were largely, and somewhat predictably, condemnatory: the New York Times, for instance, found it to be entitled to be called a bold, or rather a brazen book, but it...

Timeline

2 April 1840
Novelist Émile Zola was born in Paris, France.
11 February 1858
At Lourdes in the FrenchPyrenees, a fourteen-year-old peasant girl, Bernadette Soubirous , saw a vision which others identified as the Virgin Mary.
November 1867
Émile Zola published Thérèse Raquin, a naturalistic novel treating adultery, murder, and poetic justice.
1871-93
Émile Zola published Les Rougon-Macquart in twenty volumes: La fortune des Rougon was the first, and Le docteur Pascal the last.
1880
Émile Zola published The Experimental Novel.
By 21 February 1880
Émile Zola published Nana.
1883
George Moore , already a disciple of Zola , published his first, semi-autobiographicalnovel, A Modern Lover, in realist style.
Late 1884
Publisher Henry Vizetelly produced the first English translations of Émile Zola : the novels Nana and L'Assommoir.
1888
The National Vigilance Association brought a successful case against Henry Vizetelly for publishing English translations of Émile Zola .
15 October 1894
Captain Alfred Dreyfus , a Jewish officer in the French Army, was arrested on a (false) charge of treason.
13 January 1898
Emile Zola published J'Accuse in the newspaper L'Aurore: an open letter to President Faure of France , levelling accusations about the unjust trial and punishment of the Jewish Captain Alfred Dreyfus .
29 September 1902
Émile Zola , novelist, died at his home, Rue de Bruxelles in Paris, of carbon monoxide poisoning, which made some people suspect sabotage.