Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Family and Intimate relationships Eleanor Rathbone
Margaret Ashton , a Manchester cousin, resigned from the Liberal party over the issue of suffrage in 1906. Two years later she became the first woman elected to the Manchester City Council . She was...
Friends, Associates Maude Royden
Courtney and Royden served together as executive members of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) , of which in 1911 Courtney became secretary. They also worked together as vice-chairs for the Women's International League (WIL)
Occupation Kathleen E. Innes
Kathleen Royds (later Innes) moved to London to become office secretary of the Women's International League , British Section.
Harvey, Kathryn. "Driven by War into Politics": A Feminist Biography of Kathleen Innes. University of Alberta, 1995.
67, 246
Occupation Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
EPL became the treasurer of the newly-established British branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) . She held this position until 1922.
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. My Part in a Changing World. Hyperion, 1976.
315-16
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Occupation Kathleen E. Innes
KEI was elected Vice-Chair of the Women's International League , British Section; she remained in this position until 1934.
Harvey, Kathryn. "Driven by War into Politics": A Feminist Biography of Kathleen Innes. University of Alberta, 1995.
87
Occupation Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) elected EPL president; she held this position for nine years, after which she stepped down and became vice-president.
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. My Part in a Changing World. Hyperion, 1976.
331
Occupation Kathleen E. Innes
KEI was elected as Women's International League Chair at the Annual Council meeting held in London.
Harvey, Kathryn. "Driven by War into Politics": A Feminist Biography of Kathleen Innes. University of Alberta, 1995.
251
Occupation Kathleen E. Innes
KEI took on the Honorary Secretaryship of the Women's International League at a divisive Annual Council Meeting at which the WIL Chair, Honorary Secretary, and Honorary Treasurer all resigned.
Harvey, Kathryn. "Driven by War into Politics": A Feminist Biography of Kathleen Innes. University of Alberta, 1995.
136, 251
Occupation Kathleen E. Innes
Members of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Executive Committee elected KEI and Barbara Duncan Harris to Co-Presidency in Europe of the Peoples' Mandate to Governments .
Harvey, Kathryn. "Driven by War into Politics": A Feminist Biography of Kathleen Innes. University of Alberta, 1995.
130-1, 252
Occupation Kathleen E. Innes
At the triennial international congress of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom held in Luhacovice, Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic), KEI was elected as one of three International Vice-Chairs.
Harvey, Kathryn. "Driven by War into Politics": A Feminist Biography of Kathleen Innes. University of Alberta, 1995.
252
Occupation Maude Royden
Though she had not attended the Women's International Congress because of prohibitions on travel in the North Sea, MR became the vice-president of the Women's International League (WIL) .
“The Papers of Agnes Maude Royden”. Archives Hub: London Metropolitan University: Women’s Library.
Occupation Kathleen E. Innes
The Women's International League headquarters in London suffered damage in an air raid, and at KEI 's invitation was moved to her house, Portway, at St Mary Bourne in Hampshire.
Harvey, Kathryn. "Driven by War into Politics": A Feminist Biography of Kathleen Innes. University of Alberta, 1995.
165, 254
Occupation Maude Royden
MR succeeded Helena Swanwick in the position of chairman of the Women's International League (WIL) .
Fletcher, Sheila. Maude Royden: A Life. Basil Blackwell, 1989.
219
politics Una Marson
UM made a speech on social and political equality in Jamaica at the Women's International League conference on Africa held in London.
The Women's International League was at this time chaired by Kathleen Innes .
Jarrett-Macauley, Delia. The Life of Una Marson, 1905-65. Manchester University Press, 1998.
72
politics Virginia Woolf
With the declaration of war, however, on 4 August, 1914, VW 's politics and those of the NUWSS parted company. The NUWSS supported the government, and on August the sixth resolved to suspend political activity...

Timeline

1908
Jessie Crystal Macmillan became the first woman (other than monarchs) to address the House of Lords .
Early August 1914
In response to the support for Britain's war effort pledged by Millicent Garrett Fawcett and other National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies Executive Committee members, several leading members of the Union resigned to form the...
28 April-1 May 1915
At the International Women's Peace Congress in The Hague, thirteen hundred women delegates from twelve countries founded the International Committee of Women for Permanent Peace ; it became the Women's International League for Peace...
1 November 1915
The Women's International League (British Section) was founded at a conference held at Westminster.
December 1915
Henry Ford 's Peace Ship, the Oskar II, left harbour at Hoboken, New Jersey, with one hundred and sixty people on board; they were sailing to Europe to promote mediation in the hope of...
April 1916
The Women's International League Monthly News Sheet, organ of the British Section of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom , began publication in London.
August 1916
The Independent Suffragette began monthly publication in London.
22 January 1917
American President Woodrow Wilson made his well-known Peace Without Victory speech.
17 September 1917
Constance Todd , later Constance Coltman, became the first woman to be ordained to the ministry (of the Congregational Church) in England.
12-17 May 1919
The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom held its second conference at Zurich in Switzerland; it was at this conference that the organization assumed its lasting name.
12-17 May 1919
The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom held its second conference at Zurich in Switzerland; it was at this conference that the organization assumed its lasting name.
28 June 1919
The Treaty of Versailles was signed, settling the peace terms imposed by the victors of World War I on Germany and its allied nations.
September 1919
A conference titled Women's Right to Work, sponsored by the Women's International League , was held in Manchester.
1 January 1920
The League of Nations officially came into being—without the United States, although the first suggestion for such a body had been made by President Woodrow Wilson .