Irish Women's Franchise League

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Friends, Associates Ethel Mannin
EM 's relationship with Emma Goldman (whom she met during the 1930s and corresponded with for years) was important to both women, but difficult and often strained. Mannin dedicated Women and the Revolution (1938) to...
Occupation Constance, Countess Markievicz
She was head organizer of the relief efforts at Liberty Hall, where thousands came to be fed each day. A number of her volunteers were suffragists, mainly from the Irish Women's Franchise League .
Haverty, Anne. Constance Markievicz: An Independent Life. Pandora, 1988.
110
politics Constance, Countess Markievicz
Constance, Countess Markievicz, joined the Irish Women's Franchise League (IWFL ), founded in 1908 by her feminist, nationalist colleague, Hanna Sheehy Skeffington .
Haverty, Anne. Constance Markievicz: An Independent Life. Pandora, 1988.
79, 104
Publishing Maud Gonne
MG occasionally contributed to the Workers' Republic (1898-1916), founded by James Connolly , with whom she wrote and distributed a pamphlet entitled The Rights of Life and the Rights of Property, 1897. She also...
Textual Production Christabel Pankhurst
Her visit to Ireland was organized by the Irish Women's Franchise League ; it was followed by another visit in 1911.
Travel Charlotte Despard
CD went to Ireland again as the guest of the Irish Women's Franchise League , and stayed with Maud Gonne .
Linklater, Andro. An Unhusbanded Life. Hutchinson, 1980.
217

Timeline

11 November 1908
Hanna Sheehy Skeffington and Margaret Cousins formed the Irish Women's Franchise League , a militant, non-partisan organisation which wanted women's suffrage included in the Home Rule Bill.
21 August 1911
The Irish Women's Suffrage Federation was founded by Louie Bennett and Helen Chenevix to link smaller suffrage organisations operating across Ireland.
February 1912
Irish Women's Franchise League members held a protest outside the Gresham Hotel, Dublin, where John Redmond and the Irish Parliamentary Party were meeting.
April 1912
John Redmond , leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party , told Irish Women's Franchise League members that he would not promote women's suffrage as it would give the clergy more power.
25 May 1912
The Irish Citizen, a suffrage newspaper jointly edited by Francis Sheehy Skeffington and James Cousins , began weekly publication in London.
25 May 1912
The Irish Citizen reported that thirteen Irish Women's Franchise League members were jailed in London for up to two months each between November 1910 and March 1912.
13 June 1912
Eight Irish Women's Franchise League members, including Hanna Sheehy Skeffington and Margaret Cousins , were arrested for smashing windows in the General Post Office, Customs House, and Dublin Castle.
July 1912
The Irish Women's Franchise League organised peaceful protests around Prime Minister Asquith 's visit to Dublin, but English suffragettes travelled to Dublin and demonstrated violently.
After August 1912
James Connolly spoke in favour of women's suffrage at an Irish Women's Franchise League weekly meeting.
1913-1914
The Irish Parliamentary (pro-Home-Rule) Party took an anti-suffrage position; while its members of parliament defeated suffrage amendments to the Home Rule Bill, the Irish Women's Franchise League held protest demonstrations during Home Rule rallies.
1913
The Irish Women's Franchise League helped at the soup kitchens during a general strike and lockout; the relief effort brought together women's suffrage, nationalist, and labour organisations.
September 1913
The Ulster Unionist Council led by Edward Carson announced that a provisional Ulster government would enfranchise women.
March 1914
The Irish Women's Franchise League publicly disassociated itself from the Women's Social and Political Union .
11 April 1914
The Irish Women's Franchise League , in the Irish Citizen, criticized the recently-formed Cumann na mBan for placing nationalism before women's suffrage.
After 11 April 1914
The refusal by the Irish Women's Franchise League to support Home Rule without the enfranchisement of women led to an internal split: divisions between Irish suffragists and nationalists deepened.