Francis Sheehy Skeffington

Standard Name: Sheehy Skeffington, Francis

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Friends, Associates Katharine Tynan
At Clarebeg they began holding a literary salon for Irish writers and intellectuals. Their guests included Irish writer Padraic Colum , his wife Mary Gunning Maguire (later an eminent literary critic), poet and novelist James Stephens
politics Eva Gore-Booth
This involvement with the Rising aftermath was a highly disturbing first-hand experience of war
Lewis, Gifford. Eva Gore-Booth and Esther Roper: A Biography. Pandora Press, 1988.
141
for EGB and Roper. It informed EGB's writing, including her volume of poetry Broken Glory.
Lewis, Gifford. Eva Gore-Booth and Esther Roper: A Biography. Pandora Press, 1988.
141
She believed that...
Publishing Maud Gonne
MG occasionally contributed to the Workers' Republic (1898-1916), founded by James Connolly , with whom she wrote and distributed a pamphlet entitled The Rights of Life and the Rights of Property, 1897. She also...
Theme or Topic Treated in Text Eva Gore-Booth
Even though she described herself as an extreme pacifist,
Lewis, Gifford. Eva Gore-Booth and Esther Roper: A Biography. Pandora Press, 1988.
163
EGB sympathized with the rebels' desire for independence from British rule. She wrote poems to and about Roger Casement , Francis Sheehy Skeffington ...
Theme or Topic Treated in Text Dora Sigerson
The Tricolour addresses the events of the Rising and the Irish nationalists who fought valiantly but in vain. It begins with a prose piece, Tricolour, in which DS takes the three colours of the...

Timeline

25 May 1912
The Irish Citizen, a suffrage newspaper jointly edited by Francis Sheehy Skeffington and James Cousins , began weekly publication in London.
After 26 April 1916
Louie Bennett became editor of the Irish Citizen after Francis Sheehy Skeffington was murdered during the Easter Rising.
26 April 1916
Pacifist writer (and Republican sympathiser) Francis Sheehy Skeffington was executed with two others in Dublin by order of a British army captain, J. C. Bowen-Colthurst .
July 1920
The Irish Citizen ended publication after a British soldier wrecked the press.