Oliver Cromwell

Standard Name: Cromwell, Oliver
Used Form: Lord Protector

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Cultural formation Kate O'Brien
Though KOB 's surname was an ancient name of a royal house in Ireland, she was born into an often-forgotten segment of nineteenth-century society: the Irish Catholic middle class. She calls her Irishness my accidental...
Dedications Mary Cary
She named three dedicatees of this volume, all eminent anti-monarchical women: Elizabeth Cromwell (wife of Oliver ), Bridget Ireton (Elizabeth's daughter, and wife of Henry Ireton ), and Margaret Rolle (wife of Henry Rolle )...
Family and Intimate relationships Elizabeth Major
There were two fairly prominent contemporary Major families. One, living in Hampshire, included Dorothy Major, who married a son of Oliver Cromwell . The other lived in Blackfriars Road, London.
Greer, Germaine, Susan Hastings, Jeslyn Medoff, and Melinda Sansone, editors. Kissing the Rod. Virago, 1988.
183
Family and Intimate relationships Damaris Masham
Her mother, born Damaris Cradock, was a widow with several children from her first marriage (three sons and a daughter—who was also, confusingly, called Damaris) when she married DM 's father. From her second marriage...
Family and Intimate relationships Jane Williams
JW 's ancestor Henry Williams of Ysgafell in Montgomeryshire was a Baptist preacher and a member of the Welsh puritan Vavasor Powell 's Independent Church. In 1655 he signed Powell's Word for God, a...
Family and Intimate relationships Elizabeth Cooper
Her mother, born Bridget Claypoole or Claypole , was the only child of two second marriages: her father had formerly been married to one of Oliver Cromwell 's daughters.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
under John Claypole
Literary responses Anna Trapnel
Before the printing of AT 's vain prophecies
Trapnel, Anna. “Introduction”. The Cry of a Stone, edited by Hilary Hinds, Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2000, p. xiii - xlvii.
xviii
(as he saw them), Marchamont Needham wrote to Cromwell , saying they were desperate against your person, family, children, friends and the government,
Trapnel, Anna. “Introduction”. The Cry of a Stone, edited by Hilary Hinds, Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2000, p. xiii - xlvii.
xvii
and mentioning...
Literary responses Elizabeth Major
Joseph Caryl , the Cromwell government's official censor and perhaps EM 's minister, added a commendatory note to his licence to signify his approval of her views. Among her few modern critics, Patricia Demers has...
Literary responses Emma Robinson
The Athenæum's reviewer, Henry Fothergill Chorley , wrote that after Mary Russell Mitford 's characterization of Cromwell in her Charles the First, we know not who has conceived of the great General better...
Literary Setting Caryl Churchill
The play takes place in the period immediately following Charles I 's defeat by Cromwell , when for a short time . . . anything seemed possible.
Churchill, Caryl. Light Shining in Buckinghamshire. Pluto Press, 1978.
prelims
Critics have recognised Churchill's debt to Christopher Hill
Occupation Anne Halkett
At Kinross, Anne Murray (later AH ) spent two days practising medicine.
Halkett, Anne, and Ann, Lady Fanshawe. “Note on the Text; A Chronology of Anne, Lady Halkett”. The Memoirs of Anne, Lady Halkett and Ann, Lady Fanshawe, edited by John Loftis, Clarendon Press, 1979, pp. 3 - 7.
6
She tended wounded soldiers after the battle of Dunbar (a victory by Cromwell over the royalist side), dealing with wounds that...
politics Anna Trapnel
At this date, when religious rebirth was a political statement, AT 's conversion and her visions signified an interest in politics and a drive to concern herself, even obliquely, in shaping national events. After fasting...
politics Margaret Fell
In organising the Fund she was interested in promoting social cohesion among Quakers as well as relieving hardship.
Kunze, Bonnelyn Young. Margaret Fell and the Rise of Quakerism. Macmillan, 1994.
87
George Fox continued to frequent Swarthmoor, and at the time of the Restoration (May 1660) was...
politics Hester Biddle
George Fox later reported meeting HB in the Strand in London in about 1657, at a time when Cromwell was persecuting Quakers . She told him of her plan to seek out the future Charles II
politics Lucy Hutchinson
LH said he behaved magnanimously to such people. He signed Charles I 's death warrant, but opposed Cromwell 's gradual assumption of quasi-royal powers. He was glad to return to private life.

Timeline

23 October 1641
Many Protestants (but perhaps not so many as reported) were killed in a Rebellion or massacre in Ulster.
2 June 1644
The Battle of Marston Moor near York was fought: a singularly bloody affair, and the largest battle of the English Civil War.
April 1645
Cromwell formed his New Model Army , the first approximation to a modern, disciplined, professional fighting body.
14 June 1645
Cromwell 's New Model Army scored its first signal victory, at the battle of Naseby in Northamptonshire. This defeat for Charles I was a step towards his surrender in May 1646 and the end...
14 June 1645
Cromwell 's New Model Army scored its first signal victory, at the battle of Naseby in Northamptonshire. This defeat for Charles I was a step towards his surrender in May 1646 and the end...
From Summer 1645
Oliver Cromwell 's New Model Army gradually prevailed against Charles I .
June to 11 November 1647
Charles I was held captive in his palace at Hampton Court by Cromwell 's armies.
3 June 1647
Charles I passed into the custody of Cromwell 's New Model Army at Holmby in Northamptonshire.
6 August 1647
Cromwell 's New Model Army marched on London to quell an attempted Presbyterian counter-revolution.
15 November 1647
After the Putney Debates the Levellers planned another meeting with the New Model Army at Ware in Hertfordshire. Cromwell , however, intervened.
5 January 1649
An English widow named Johanna Cartwright , resident in Amsterdam with her son Ebenezer , presented to General Sir Thomas Fairfax a pamphlet whose lengthy title begins The Petition of the Jewes.
27 January 1649
Ann or Anne Fairfax (wife of the former parliamentary commander Sir Thomas Fairfax ) made her second verbal intervention in the trial of Charles I .
15 August 1649
English troops under Oliver Cromwell landed at Ringsend outside Dublin with the aim of putting down the rebellion which had lasted in Ireland from October 1641.
11 September 1649
Irish Catholics were massacred by Cromwell 's army after they captured the town of Drogheda in Ireland from royalist Sir Arthur Aston.
1651
Manasseh ben Israel wrote from Amsterdam to Oliver Cromwell to request legal admission for the Jews to England: he argued that this would help to bring about the birth of the Messiah.