National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Education Dora Marsden
Though some of DM 's activities and affiliations are unclear, studying and living in Manchester was a highly formative experience for her. By then the city had established strong ties with the labour and suffrage...
Employer Isabella Ormston Ford
IOF 's usually unpaid work for the causes near and dear to her heart drew on a wide range of skills: as speaker and propagandist, administrator and organizer, and translator. Such work—during this later time...
Family and Intimate relationships Eleanor Rathbone
Margaret Ashton , a Manchester cousin, resigned from the Liberal party over the issue of suffrage in 1906. Two years later she became the first woman elected to the Manchester City Council . She was...
Friends, Associates Maude Royden
Courtney and Royden served together as executive members of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) , of which in 1911 Courtney became secretary. They also worked together as vice-chairs for the Women's International League (WIL)
Health Maude Royden
MR suffered from severe headaches and migraines throughout her adult life. She was forced to take a sick leave from her work at the NUWSS from April 1914 to the end of the year.
Fletcher, Sheila. Maude Royden: A Life. Basil Blackwell, 1989.
253-4, 257
Literary responses Beatrice Harraden
The play's outspoken support of the Women's Social and Political Union was apparently not popular with the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies .
Hayman, Carole, and Dale Spender, editors. How the Vote Was Won: and Other Suffragette Plays. Methuen, 1985.
91
Recent editor Carole Hayman remarks that this play offers the...
Literary responses Dora Marsden
The close friendship of these two was near its end. Letters on The Freewoman from Mary Augusta (Mrs Humphry) Ward and Agnes Maude Royden , a prominent member of the NUWSS , were printed in...
Material Conditions of Writing Millicent Garrett Fawcett
Since her resignation as President of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies , she had more time for her writing, which she enjoyed.
Strachey, Ray. Millicent Garrett Fawcett. J. Murray, 1931.
343-3
This work was re-issued by Cambridge University Press in 2011,online...
Material Conditions of Writing Millicent Garrett Fawcett
At the time of writing, the number of Women's Suffrage societies was growing very rapidly and MGF often received gifts of money to aid the work of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies ...
Occupation Maude Royden
MR , a staunch supporter of women's rights and suffrage, began speaking regularly for the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) . She served on the executive committee from 1911 to 1915.
Royden, Maude. Sex and Common-Sense. G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1922.
prelims
“The Papers of Agnes Maude Royden”. Archives Hub: London Metropolitan University: Women’s Library.
Fletcher, Sheila. Maude Royden: A Life. Basil Blackwell, 1989.
90, 121
Occupation Ray Strachey
Philippa Strachey was also active in the bureau, which shifted after the war to dealing with the problems of women newly unemployed because of men returning from the armed forces. Edith Lyttelton joined in the...
politics Sarah Grand
As president of the Tunbridge Wells branch of the NUWSS , SG recruited a large contingent of pilgrims to march in the Women's Pilgrimage to Hyde Park, London.
Kersley, Gillian. Darling Madame: Sarah Grand and Devoted Friend. Virago Press, 1983.
112
politics Eleanor Rathbone
ER succeeded Millicent Garrett Fawcett as President of the National Union of Societies for Equal Citizenship (NUSEC )—formerly the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS )—a post she held for ten years.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
politics Sarah Grand
In an interview in 1896, SG made clear her belief in the need for female suffrage: We shall do no good until we get the Franchise, for however well-intentioned men may be, they cannot understand...
politics Isabella Ormston Ford
IOF was elected to sit on the Executive Committee of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS).
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Hannam, June. Isabella Ford. Basil Blackwell, 1989.
xii, 122

Timeline

14 October 1897
The National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies was established under the leadership of Millicent Garrett Fawcett .
16-17 October 1903
The National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies sponsored a National Convention in Defence of the Civic Rights of Women in London; the conference's aim was to develop strategies to make suffrage an issue in...
19 May 1906
Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman , newly-elected Prime Minister, received a deputation of suffragists.
January 1907
The Artists' Suffrage League was founded to further the cause of Women's enfranchisement by the work and professional help of artists.
Tickner, Lisa. The Spectacle of Women: Imagery of the Suffrage Campaign, 1907-1914. University of Chicago Press, 1988.
16
9 February 1907
The National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies organised a demonstration to coincide with the opening of the next session of Parliament (the biggest suffragist public event so far); because of the pouring rain, it became...
8 March 1907
With the support of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies , Liberal Member of Parliament Willoughby H. Dickinson introduced a Women's Enfranchisement Bill for its second reading.
End of January 1908
The National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies sent a deputation to discuss the issue of women's suffrage with Herbert Asquith .
13 June 1908
The National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies organised a co-ordinated procession in London which included 10,000 women from forty-two organizations.
21 June 1908
The Women's Social and Political Union organised a Woman's Sunday which involved (according to the Times estimate) between 250,000 and 500,000 people, mostly women. The WSPU called it Britain's largest-ever political meeting.
12 November 1908
The Times published a letter by the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies stating their disapproval of suffragette militancy; the letter had been sent to all Members of Parliament as well as the press.
15 April 1909
The Common Cause, the official organ of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies , began weekly publication in Manchester.
27 April 1909
The National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies organized the Pageant of Women's Trades and Professions.
About 9 October 1909
In response to Women's Social and Political Union militancy, the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies passed a resolution stating that it would employ only constitutional
Hume, Leslie Parker. The National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, 1897-1914. Garland, 1982.
55
means towards achieving the vote.
April 1910
The National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies passed a resolution supporting the Conciliation Bill proposed by the Conciliation Committee .
18 June 1910
A From Prison to Citizenship Procession, in support of the Conciliation Bill, took place in London, organised by the Women's Social and Political Union and the Women's Freedom League .