Women's Freedom League

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
politics Marie Stopes
Stopes was a feminist and suffragist before she became a birth-control activist. Her retention of her own name after marriage was a political act. On the suffrage issue she was a non-militant, belonging to the...
politics Cicely Hamilton
CH was an active member of several suffrage organizations, always aligning herself with the non-militant suffragists. She first belonged to the Women's Social and Political Union , but in 1907 she left to join the...
politics Beatrice Harraden
BH was identified in an interview of 1897 as a pronounced Suffragist.
Crawford, Elizabeth. The Women’s Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928. Routledge, 2001.
276
She was a prominent member of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) and the Women's Freedom League (to both of which...
politics Violet Hunt
VH shared a self-described passion for women's suffrage
Hunt, Violet. I Have This to Say. Boni and Liveright, 1926.
51
with Sinclair, her longtime friend. Sinclair introduced her to the Women's Suffrage League , the Women's Freedom League , and the Women's Social and Political Union
politics Dora Marsden
Following her split with the WSPU , DM considered joining the Women's Freedom League or the Fabian Society , but instead began to plan for a radical feminist journal that would stimulate discussion of diverse...
politics Eunice Guthrie Murray
EGM accepted a post with the Women's Freedom League in Scotland as secretary for scattered members—those living outside large cities.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
politics Eunice Guthrie Murray
EGM (who this year became president in Scotland of the Women's Freedom League ) was arrested for speaking at a meeting outside the Prime Minister's house in Downing Street, London.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
politics Jane Hume Clapperton
She also joined the Central arm of this organization in 1890, subscribed to the Women's Emancipation Union in 1894 and 1896, and subscribed to the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) in 1907. By 1908...
politics Eunice Guthrie Murray
Her interest in suffrage succeeded to an interest in the temperance movement. She became an active suffrage lecturer, and (with her mother and one of her sisters) joined the Women's Freedom League (founded by Charlotte Despard
politics Edith Craig
EC and Christopher St John worked with Charlotte Despard 's new Women's Freedom League .
Cockin, Katharine. Edith Craig (1869-1947): Dramatic Lives. Cassell, 1998.
83
politics Charlotte Despard
CD was a leader among those dissenters from the WSPU who founded the Women's Freedom League for constitutional militants. She was to become president of the new organization.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
politics Charlotte Despard
CD stood as a pacifist Labour candidate on 14 December 1918, for the constituency she knew best, in Battersea, in the first British election in which women were entitled to do so, and was...
politics Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
While the WSPU 's recruitment increased during 1907, its governing members began to disagree over its direction: one party wanted the Union to be run democratically with a constitution, while the other, headed by Emmeline
politics May Sinclair
MS became a member of the Women Writers' Suffrage League some time after it was founded in June 1908.
Boll, Theophilus E. M. Miss May Sinclair: Novelist: A Biographical and Critical Introduction. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1973.
96
That year she also joined the Women's Freedom League , collected money in the streets...
politics Christopher St John
She was arrested in 1909 for setting a pillar box on fire. She worked for the Women's Social and Political Union , the Writers' Franchise League (which she helped found), the Catholic Women's Suffrage Society

Timeline

October 1907
Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst and Emmeline and Frederick Pethick-Lawrence , wanting to maintain control over the Women's Social and Political Union agenda, removed by fiat dissident members of the executive and cancelled the forthcoming annual conference.
February 1909
The Suffrage Atelier was established; like members of the Artists' Suffrage League , SA members produced posters and banners to advertise suffrage activities.
18 June 1910
A From Prison to Citizenship Procession, in support of the Conciliation Bill, took place in London, organised by the Women's Social and Political Union and the Women's Freedom League .
17 June 1911
The Women's Coronation Procession was attended by 40,000 women from at least twenty-eight women's suffrage organisations, including both the Women's Social and Political Union and the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies .
6 March 1912
The Women's Freedom League denounced Women's Social and Political Union militancy in a letter to the Manchester Guardian.
After 4 August 1914
The Women's Freedom League formed the Women's Suffrage National Aid Corps to assist women and children during wartime.
September 1914
Two women's police forces were formed: the Women's Police Volunteers and the Women Patrols .
Saturday 19 June 1926
About a hundred thousand participants of the Peacemakers' Pilgrimage (all wearing blue armbands showing the white dove of peace and the word Pax) converged on Hyde Park in London.
2 February 1927
Margaret Rhondda , as Chairman of the Equal Political Rights Campaign Committee , with many other suffrage veterans, signed a letter to the editor of The Times pressing for women to vote on equal terms with men.
6 July 1928
Four days after the Representation of the People (Equal Franchise) Act received the royal assent, a celebratory breakfast was held at the Hotel Cecil in London.