Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

Standard Name: Anderson, Elizabeth Garrett
Used Form: Elizabeth Garrett

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
death George Eliot
Her younger husband wrote that he was stunned by the frightful suddenness of her death.
Ashton, Rosemary. George Eliot: A Life. Hamish Hamilton, 1996.
379
She was buried in Highgate Cemetery, London; the large attendance at the funeral included her estranged brother Isaac
Education Sophia Jex-Blake
In reponse to this incident, Henry Maudsley , lecturer in insanity at St Mary's Hospital, published the article Sex in Mind and in Education, opposing medical education for women. His article in turn prompted...
Education Sophia Jex-Blake
The two women first had to complete their medical degrees at Bern in Switzerland, then gain clinical experience in London, before sitting the examinations in Dublin. Annie Clark , Eliza Walker Dunbar
Family and Intimate relationships Millicent Garrett Fawcett
Several of MGF 's sisters were concerned with the status of women. Elizabeth Garrett (later Elizabeth Garrett Anderson) was pre-eminent amongst them: she became the first female doctor in Britain, whose successful entrance to, and...
Family and Intimate relationships Millicent Garrett Fawcett
Apparently he had proposed to other young women before being accepted by Millicent. According to Ann Oakley , Millicent's sister Elizabeth may have opposed the marriage because although she herself had declined to marry Henry...
Friends, Associates Helen Taylor
HT moved in political and social circles that included Elizabeth Garrett Anderson , Millicent Garrett Fawcett , Louisa Garrett Anderson , Emily Davies , Elizabeth Wolstenholme , Frances Mary Buss , Dorothea Beale , and Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon .
Kent, Susan Kingsley. Sex and Suffrage in Britain, 1860-1914. Princeton University Press, 1987.
186
Robson, Ann P., John M. Robson, John Stuart Mill, Harriet Taylor, and Helen Taylor. “Introduction and Editorial Materials”. Sexual Equality, University of Toronto Press, 1994, p. vii - xxxv; various pages.
xxvii
Friends, Associates Mary Augusta Ward
She met a number of important writers through her newspaper work. She associated with Alexander Macmillan , Sir George Grove , Edmund Gosse and his wife Ellen , John Morley , and her uncle Matthew Arnold
Friends, Associates Jessie Boucherett
Partly through her membership of the Kensington Society (a social and political discussion group of about fifty women inaugurated in 1865), JB broadened her acquaintance with significant members of the feminist movement, including Frances Power Cobbe
Friends, Associates Sophia Jex-Blake
A few months following her arrival in Edinburgh, SJB received a letter from Elizabeth Garrett outlining Garrett's intention to apply to Edinburgh University to study medicine. Garrett spent two weeks living with SJB ...
Friends, Associates Emily Davies
At Gateshead, ED began life-long friendships with Annie Crow (later Austin) and Jane Crow (from 1848), and Elizabeth Garrett (later Anderson), from 1854. No letters from her to Anderson survive, although a number from Anderson...
Friends, Associates Marie Belloc Lowndes
Edmund Garrett (a cousin of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and Millicent Garrett Fawcett ) was the first young Englishman whom Marie Belloc had ever got to know well; as a French girl, she was equally strange...
Friends, Associates Constance Naden
CN was a friend of the two poets who shared the name Michael Field (who also came from Birmingham) and of the medical doctor Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (who presumably did not hold against her the...
Friends, Associates Louisa May Alcott
LMA was a friend of, among others, Frances Hodgson Burnett , Ralph Waldo Emerson , who helped her family manage their financial difficulties, and Henry David Thoreau , who taught science to her and her...
Friends, Associates Evelyn Sharp
Others with whom she shared this or that memorable experience were the Meynells (Wilfrid , Alice , and Viola ), Clarence Rook and his wife, and Henry W. Nevinson , whom she eventually married...
Friends, Associates Edith J. Simcox
Her connection with George Eliot and her own political activities brought EJS into friendly association with a number of key social figures including William Morris , Eliza Orme , and Elizabeth Garrett Anderson .
Fulmer, Constance M., Margaret E. Barfield, and Edith J. Simcox. “Preface, Introduction and Editorial Materials”. A Monument to the Memory of George Eliot, Garland, 1998, pp. xi - xvii, 1.
xii
Fulmer, Constance M. “A Nineteenth Century ’Womanist’ on Gender Issues: Edith Simcox in her Autobiography of a Shirtmaker”. Nineteenth Century Prose, No. 2, pp. 110 - 26.
115

Timeline

December 1809
Posing as a male and calling herself James Barry, Margaret Bulkley or Bulkeley entered Edinburgh Medical School, thus launching what became a distinguished career in medicine.
Probably October 1858
The Ladies' National Association for the Diffusion of Sanitary Knowledge was founded through the work of Isa Craig , Elizabeth Garrett , and Lady Stanley of Alderley , and others.
August 1860
Elizabeth Garrett began her work at Middlesex Hospital as a nurse and unofficial student.
October 1860
Elizabeth Garrett asked to register formally as a medical student at Middlesex Hospital, but her request was denied.
June 1861
A meeting of the Medical School Committee of the Middlesex Hospital considered a protest from a group of male students against the dangerous innovation of female students.
23 May 1865
The Kensington Society , a quarterly women's discussion group devoted to social and political issues, held its inaugural meeting in London.
October 1865
Elizabeth Garrett obtained an apothecary's licence through the Society of Apothecaries : this began her medical career, after her rejection by the Universities of London , Edinburgh , St Andrews , Oxford , and Cambridge .
June 1866
Elizabeth Garrett (Britain's first female medical practitioner, an apothecary qualified since the previous October) established St Mary's Dispensary for Women in Seymour Place, Marylebone, London.
1869
The East London Hospital for Sick Children opened; this was the first hospital in the country to admit children under the age of two years.
February 1869
Denied access to a degree in England because of her sex but with an apothecary's licence and considerable medical experience behind her, Elizabeth Garrett began her medical degree at the Sorbonne , Paris, from...
18 September 1869
Elizabeth Garrett published a letter in The Lancet informing readers that two scholarships were available for women's medical study, each worth £50 for three years.
25 January 1870
Elizabeth Garrett wrote an article for The Pall Mall Gazette in favour of the Contagious Diseases Acts.
March 1870
Elizabeth Garrett was designated visiting Medical Officer at the East London Hospital for Sick Children; she was the first female doctor ever hired for a hospital post.
June 1870
Elizabeth Garrett graduated with a medical degree from the Sorbonne, having been unable to obtain one in England.
9 August 1870
The Education Act established a national elementary education system governed by local school boards, to which women could be elected.