King George IV

Standard Name: George IV, King
Used Form: Prince of Wales
Used Form: Prince Regent
Used Form: George the Fourth

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Dedications Jane Austen
About a month before Emma appeared (on 23 December, with 1816 on its title-page), JA wrote to ascertain whether it was actually incumbent on
Fergus, Jan. “The Professional Woman Writer”. The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen, edited by Edward Copeland and Juliet McMaster, Cambridge University Press, 1997.
26
her to dedicate it to the Prince of Wales .
Fergus, Jan. “The Professional Woman Writer”. The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen, edited by Edward Copeland and Juliet McMaster, Cambridge University Press, 1997.
26
Dedications Anna Jane Vardill
The full title was Poems and Translations from the Minor Greek Poets and Others: written chiefly between the ages of ten and sixteen. The volume was supplied with two title-pages, one conventionally printed and...
Dedications Sarah Pearson
S. Pearson's only novel, an it-narrative entitled The Medallion, was advertised as in print, dedicated to the Prince of Wales . The author must be the Sheffield poet; the publisher's receipt gives her...
Dedications Maria Barrell
An Advertisement notes that she had to find another printer after the first one let her down. Writing, she says, in the sad regions of a living grave, she dedicates her work to George, Prince of Wales
Dedications Felicia Hemans
The attractive quarto volume, printed in Liverpool for T. Cadell and W. Davies in London, was dedicated with permission to the Prince of Wales . It had 977 other subscribers, including Captain Alfred Hemans
Dedications Eleanor Anne Porden
EAP published her epic poem: Coeur de Lion ; or, The Third Crusade. A Poem, in Sixteen Books, dedicated with permission to George IV .
Quarterly Review. J. Murray.
27 (1822): 271
Dedications Jane Porter
JP , at Long Ditton in Surrey, dedicated her new novel, Duke Christian of Luneburg; or, Tradition from the Hartz, to George IV .
Porter, Jane. Duke Christian of Luneburg. Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1824.
1: v-viii
Dedications Emily Frederick Clark
It was dedicated by permission to the Prince of Wales and its subscription was advertised at the back of other books. The advertisement says: An appeal to the sympathetic feelings of a liberal public would...
Employer Ellis Cornelia Knight
ECK 's position as a lady companion to Princess Charlotte was complicated by the intention of the princess's father, the Regent , to keep his daughter as long as possible a child.
Knight, Ellis Cornelia. The Autobiography of Miss Knight. Fulford, RogerEditor , William Kimber & Co., 1960.
114
While subject...
Employer Ellis Cornelia Knight
The Regent made no complaint about ECK at her dismissal, but it would appear that the dismissal was related to Princess Charlotte's decision that she would not marry a prince who seemed likely to subordinate...
Family and Intimate relationships Mary Robinson
MR later separated from Thomas after becoming mistress to the Prince of Wales .
Family and Intimate relationships Mary Robinson
A couple of days after her royal command performance as Perdita, an emissary of the Prince of Wales brought her a short but expressive
Robinson, Mary. Perdita: The Memoirs of Mary Robinson. Levy, Moses JosephEditor , Peter Owen, 1994.
103
love-letter signed Florizel (the name of the king's son in...
Family and Intimate relationships Grace Elliott
GE bore a daughter, Georgina or Georgiana , whose paternity was variously ascribed to several of her lovers (including the Prince of Wales , with whom she had broken up some months before the birth)...
Family and Intimate relationships Grace Elliott
In her earliest years in Paris she was the mistress first of the comte d'Artois (who much later reigned as Charles X ) and then of the duc de Chartres (later duc d'Orléans , later...
Family and Intimate relationships Harriette Wilson
While at Brighton HW made a proposition by letter to the Prince of Wales (if you pity me, and believe you could make me in love with you, write to me)
Wilson, Frances. The Courtesan’s Revenge. Faber, 2003.
38
but...

Timeline

29 December 1709
Richard Steele 's reference in The Tatler to the new fashion of hoop petticoats marked the establishment of the mode in England or at least in London.
21 December 1785
The Prince of Wales married Mrs Fitzherbert , secretly but in the presence of reliable witnesses.
28 September 1786
A hostile and sexually suggestive cartoon was published, depicting Mrs Fitzherbert dispensing venereal remedies to the Prince of Wales .
11 June 1788
George III , at the resort town of Cheltenham, publicly suffered preliminary symptoms leading up to his second attack of porphyria, which began on 17 October.
5 November 1788-10 March 1789
George III 's illness and palpable incapacity produced the Regency Crisis: the issue was whether or not power would devolve to the Prince of Wales .
8 April 1795
The Prince of Wales (later George IV) married Princess Caroline of Brunswick.
7 January 1796
Princess Charlotte was born to the Prince and Princess of Wales.
1804
The Prince of Wales (later George IV) was given full custody of his daughter Princess Charlotte ; George III (her grandfather) became her guardian.
18 September 1809
The new Covent Garden Theatre was opened, only to become the scene of massive riots.
28 September 1810
Abraham Goldsmid , a London banker, committed suicide; his suicide was symptomatic of the current financial collapse.
5 February 1811
The Prince of Wales (later George IV) became Regent in view of his father 's renewed (and, as it turned out, final) lapse into madness.
February 1812
The Prince of Wales 's Regency was made permanent, in recognition that George III was not expected to recover.
28 April 1813
The Act to build Regent Circus (now Regent Street), a grand shopping thoroughfare, was brought before parliament; construction was completed in 1820.
Winter1814-15
Evangelical William Wilberforce stayed in Brighton during the winter season in order to have access to the Prince Regent and attempt a conversion within the monarchy.
May 1816
Princess Charlotte (daughter of the Prince of Wales ) married Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg .