Lucretius

Standard Name: Lucretius

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Intertextuality and Influence Hélène Barcynska
She used as epigraph for her biography some lines from Lucretius about spiritual journeying. She begins with the death of Caradoc Evans and moves back to her account of his life, which purports to owe...
Intertextuality and Influence Lucy Hutchinson
Lucretius , as a pagan philosopher and theologian (and, as LH and her contemporaries believed, insane much of the time and sexually promiscuous), was a daring choice for one of her religious opinions.
Lucretius, and Lucretius. “Introduction”. Lucy Hutchinson’s Translation of Lucretius, "De rerum natura", edited by Hugh De Quehen, translated by. Lucy Hutchinson, University of Michigan Press, 1996, pp. 1 - 20.
8, 11
Intertextuality and Influence Henrietta Rouviere Mosse
The widely varied quotations heading the chapters include some in Latin (Virgil , Cicero , Lucretius , Horace ) and some in French (Rousseau , Voltaire , Marmontel , and Manon Roland ). The English writers quoted include Mary Robinson .
McLeod, Deborah. The Minerva Press. University of Alberta, 1997.
Literary responses Caroline Clive
The volume firmly established CC 's reputation as a gifted and talented writer. She was delighted when John Gibson Lockhart wrote (under the impression that he was addressing a man) that he was deeply impressed...
Author summary Lucy Hutchinson
LH has been long known as the author of memoirs of her husband which are also a significant historical account of the Englich Civil War. Her petitions and religious writings were also known, though less...
Reception Lucy Hutchinson
Since her tally of works in print began to climb steeply in the 1990s, anthologists Jane Stevenson and Peter Davidson have called LHone of the most important poets, man or woman, of the mid-century...
Textual Production Aphra Behn
AB dated her commendatory poem for the second edition of Thomas Creech 's translation of Lucretius , De rerum natura.
O’Donnell, Mary Ann. Aphra Behn: An Annotated Bibliography of Primary and Secondary Sources. Garland, 1986.
259-60
Todd, Janet. The Secret Life of Aphra Behn. Rutgers University Press, 1997.
291-4
Textual Production Dora Carrington
Carrington cut (and most likely designed) the title page and first letter of the Omega Workshops ' third publication, Lucretius on Death.
Hill, Jane, and Michael Holroyd. The Art of Dora Carrington. Herbert Press, 1994.
38-9, 138
Textual Production Anne Francis
Both versions were Printed for the Author. The title-page with the author's name gave a quotation from Lucretius in Latin with extended translation (about bees gathering honey), and mentioned the names of booksellers stocking the...
Textual Production Lucy Hutchinson
LH translated into English verse all six books of Lucretius , De rerum natura.
Editor David Norbrook believes that the translation dates from the 1650s.
Hutchinson, Lucy. “Introduction, Chronology”. Order and Disorder, edited by David Norbrook, Blackwell, 2001, p. i - lviii.
x
Lucretius,. Lucy Hutchinson’s Translation of Lucretius, "De rerum natura". De Quehen, HughEditor , Hutchinson, LucyTranslator , University of Michigan Press, 1996.
Textual Production Lucy Hutchinson
LH sent a copy of her version of Lucretius ' De rerum natura to the dedicatee, Lord Anglesey , to dispose of as he thought best.
Greer, Germaine. “Horror like Thunder”. London Review of Books, pp. 22 - 4.
22
Lucretius, and Lucretius. “Introduction”. Lucy Hutchinson’s Translation of Lucretius, "De rerum natura", edited by Hugh De Quehen, translated by. Lucy Hutchinson, University of Michigan Press, 1996, pp. 1 - 20.
10
Textual Production Lucy Hutchinson
By this date, she had come to despise Lucretius and think it a sin to translate him; she was then painfully deprecatory
Mayo, Thomas Franklin. Epicurus in England (1650-1725). Southwest Press, 1934.
21
about her own work.
Mayo, Thomas Franklin. Epicurus in England (1650-1725). Southwest Press, 1934.
21-2

Timeline

1684
The first volume appeared of Miscellany Poems, an influential poetryanthology connected with the names of Jacob Tonson the elder, publisher, and John Dryden ; the final part came out in 1709.