Frederick William Pethick-Lawrence

Standard Name: Pethick-Lawrence, Frederick William
Used Form: F. W. Pethick-Lawrence

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Dedications Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
She dedicated it to Frederick William Pethick-Lawrence my husband and in the many changes of life my unchanging comrade and my best friend.
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. My Part in a Changing World. Hyperion.
prelims
Family and Intimate relationships Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
Emmeline Pethick 's close friend Mark Guy Pearse officiated at her wedding to Frederick Lawrence at the Town Hall in Canning Town.
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. My Part in a Changing World. Hyperion.
107, 124
Brittain, Vera. Pethick-Lawrence: A Portrait. George Allen and Unwin.
30
Family and Intimate relationships Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
Over the course of his lifetime, Frederick Pethick-Lawrence served in the House of Commons for eighteen years and in the House of Lords for sixteen. He became the Secretary of State for India and for...
Family and Intimate relationships Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
EPL greatly admired Mark Guy Pearse , an evangelical Christian socialist who co-founded the West London Mission . She had known him since her childhood, and he became a second father to her.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray et al., editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. http://www.oxforddnb.com/.
Pearse supported...
Friends, Associates Mary Gawthorpe
During her time with the WSPU, MG worked with Christabel Pankhurst (who was twenty-four when Gawthorpe first met her, before she had yet met Isabella Ford ), whom, like Ethel Snowden , she knew from...
Friends, Associates Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
During her stay in India, EPL met the poet Rabindranath Tagore .
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. My Part in a Changing World. Hyperion.
338
Back in England, she contacted Vera Brittain after having read Brittain's Testament of Youth, 1933, to invite Brittain to visit the...
Friends, Associates Evelyn Sharp
Others with whom she shared this or that memorable experience were the Meynells (Wilfrid , Alice , and Viola ), Clarence Rook and his wife, and Henry W. Nevinson , whom she eventually married...
Friends, Associates Evelyn Sharp
Some of the friends with whom she remained in contact into her final years were Eleanor Farjeon , Frederick Pethick-Lawrence , and Elizabeth Robinson .
John, Angela V. Evelyn Sharp: Rebel Woman, 1869–1955. Manchester University Press.
224-5
Literary responses Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
EPL 's involvement in the militant suffrage movement was necessarily controversial: contemporaries both lauded and reviled her. In her diary Virginia Woolf described EPL 's style of public speaking in 1918 with some disdain. I...
Occupation Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
EPL stayed with the WSPU, which, after the split, composed a pledge which all members had to sign: I endorse the objects and methods of the Women's Social and Political Union and hereby undertake not...
Occupation Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
EPL attended the Woman's Sunday mass suffrage demonstration in Hyde Park that she and her husband had organised; by her reckoning upwards of 250,000 supporters marched in seven processions through the park.
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. My Part in a Changing World. Hyperion.
183
Brittain, Vera. Pethick-Lawrence: A Portrait. George Allen and Unwin.
43
Performance of text Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
In 1913 the Woman's Press published speeches by the accused at the trial of EPL , her husband , and Emmeline Pankhurst in 1912, when all three were charged with conspiring to cause harm. The...
politics Stella Benson
SB had been a moderate until the death of the Derby Martyr, Emily Wilding Davison , in 1913. After this she became more militant. When she moved to London in May 1914, she called...
politics Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
While EPL was in prison, her husband took over for her as joint-treasurer of the WSPU. Over the years, Frederick Pethick-Lawrence mediated interactions between the police and the suffragists, and often he was the one...
politics Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
EPL went to prison at least five more times over the course of her fight for female suffrage. She did not suffer from claustrophobia or anxiety in later imprisonments; on the contrary, at times she...

Timeline

: The Women's Social and Political Union moved...

National or international item

Summer1906

The Women's Social and Political Union moved its headquarters to London; this relocation was emblematic of its shift away from its Independent Labour Party and working-class origins.

October 1907: Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst and Emmeline...

National or international item

October 1907

Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst and Emmeline and Frederick Pethick-Lawrence , wanting to maintain control over the Women's Social and Political Union agenda, removed by fiat dissident members of the executive and cancelled the forthcoming annual conference.

October 1907: Votes for Women, the official organ of the...

Building item

October 1907

Votes for Women, the official organ of the Women's Social and Political Union , began publication in London.

28 March 1912: The Conciliation Bill (on suffrage) was defeated...

National or international item

28 March 1912

The Conciliation Bill (on suffrage) was defeated in a House of Commons vote, after passing its second reading (the previous year) with a huge majority.

6 February 1914: The United Suffragists was established as...

National or international item

6 February 1914

The United Suffragists was established as a new organisation open to men and women, militant and non-militant members.

February 1918: Votes for Women, an organ of the Women's...

Building item

February 1918

Votes for Women, an organ of the Women's Social and Political Union , ceased publication in London.

6 July 1928: Four days after the Representation of the...

Building item

6 July 1928

Four days after the Representation of the People (Equal Franchise) Act received the royal assent, a celebratory breakfast was held at the Hotel Cecil in London.

Texts

Pankhurst, Christabel. Unshackled: The Story of How We Won the Vote. Editor Pethick-Lawrence, Frederick William, Hutchinson, 1959.
Pethick-Lawrence, Frederick William, and Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence, editors. Votes for Women. Reformer’s Press.