Giovanni Boccaccio

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Standard Name: Boccaccio, Giovanni
Used Form: Boccace

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Friends, Associates Petrarch
At the age of eight Petrarch saw Dante for the first and only time. One of the most important friendships of his life was that with Boccaccio .
“The Catholic Encyclopedia”. New Advent.
under Dante
“The Catholic Encyclopedia”. New Advent.
Intertextuality and Influence Mary Anne Barker
MAB 's discussion of schools leads her into an account of a visit made by the Norwegian missionary, Bishop Schreuder , to a later Zulu chief, Cetshwayo , taken from a blue-book or government report...
Intertextuality and Influence Mary Lamb
M. B.'s purpose in story-telling is not moral improvement but making little girls feel better (the youngest is seven): cheering them up since, newly sent to boarding school, they are crying for home; alleviating their...
Intertextuality and Influence Delarivier Manley
These novellas follow at more than one remove writers further back than Painter (Boccaccio , Matteo Bandello , Marguerite de Navarre , and Chaucer ) in refashioning and retelling traditional stories. Most dated back...
Literary responses Dora Sigerson
The reviewer for the Times Literary Supplement found this method of compiling stories (the method of Boccaccio , Marguerite de Navarre , and Chaucer ) effective for stringing together a number of diverse tales told...
Publishing Muriel Jaeger
The publishers' advertising contained a submerged allusion to Jaeger's following here of the concept of Boccaccio 's Decameron, dating from nearly six hundred years earlier.
Textual Features Marguerite de Navarre
Whereas Boccaccio 's tale-tellers had retired to a country house while the plague raged in town, and those in Chaucer 's Canterbury Tales were on pilgrimage, Marguerite de Navarre 's travellers are stranded at an...
Textual Features Mary Pix
MP adapted this from the eighth tale of Boccaccio 's second day.
Foxon, David F. English Verse 1701-1750. Cambridge University Press, 1975.
She begins with a formal invocation of her Muse, and a statement that her subject-matter will be the various Turns of Virtue in...
Textual Features Violet Hunt
The text consists of twenty-four pieces written by Ford and previously published in the Outlook and the Daily News, which are connected here by VH 's linking prose. Hunt's biographer Barbara Belford refers to...
Textual Production Marguerite de Navarre
The title too was posthumously applied, on the analogy of Boccaccio 's Decameron, meaning tales from ten days. Marguerite de Navarre probably intended, as he did, a collection of a hundred stories, but she...
Textual Production Mary Pix
MP published an anonymous verse tale, Violenta; or, The Rewards of Virtue: turn'd from Boccace into verse.
Foxon, David F. English Verse 1701-1750. Cambridge University Press, 1975.
Textual Production Christina Stead
Having accepted her novel Seven Poor Men of Sydney, Peter Llewelyn Davies had wanted to publish it as her second work, to follow something else less unconventional. He got as far as advertising another...
Textual Production Fay Weldon
FW issued The Spa Decameron, a work whose title defines it as a collection, like Boccaccio 's, of tales contributed by upper-class people sharing a temporary space.
Blackwell’s Online Bookshop.
Textual Production Catherine Carswell
CC published The Tranquil Heart: Portrait of Giovanni Boccaccio, a biography she undertook because of Boccaccio 's declaration that he wrote for women.
Pilditch, Jan. Catherine Carswell. A Biography. John Donald, 2007.
161 and n50
Carswell, John, and Catherine Carswell. “Introduction”. The Savage Pilgrimage: A Narrative of D. H. Lawrence, Cambridge University Press, 1981, p. v - xxxv.
xxxii
Textual Production Catherine Carswell
She says in her preface: Again and again Boccaccio repeated that he wrote for women's instruction and delight, yet none but men have written about him.
Carswell, John, and Catherine Carswell. “Introduction”. The Savage Pilgrimage: A Narrative of D. H. Lawrence, Cambridge University Press, 1981, p. v - xxxv.
xxxii
She called the Decameronthat radiant and lovely...

Timeline

About 1349-1351
Giovanni Boccaccio worked at his cycle of tales entitled (from the fact that the stories are told over the course of ten days) the Decameron. It was first translated into English in 1620.
1495
In a bonfire of the vanities in Florence, Italy, Girolamo Savonarola destroyed texts by Ovid , Dante , Boccaccio and others.
1559
After a suppressed edition of 1555, there was published the anonymous A Myrroure for Magistrates: a collection of verse laments by famous men and women about how fortune brought them down in the end.
22 March 1620
The first English translation of Boccaccio 's cycle of tales generally known as the Decameron was entered in the Stationers' Register ; it was printed this year, possibly the work of John Florio .
1676
Tachmas, Prince of Persia: An Historical Novel (a translation by P. Porter from the French of Jean Renaud de Segrais ) marks an early use of this genre term.