William Lloyd Garrison

Standard Name: Garrison, William Lloyd

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Friends, Associates Antoinette Brown Blackwell
Antoinette Brown met Lucy Stone during her first few weeks at Oberlin College . In her journal Brown mentioned her hopes that the two would become friends after she had heard Stone described by an...
Friends, Associates Mary Howitt
Visitors who stayed with the Howitts at The Elms included Hans Christian Andersen , Tennyson , Elizabeth Gaskell , and Eliza Meteyard , who wrote as Silver Pen. Their circle also included Charles Dickens
Friends, Associates Harriet Jacobs
HJ 's friendships with white people have left traces behind them; her friendships with black people have not. When she arrived in Rochester in 1849, HJ stayed briefly with Amy Post , a white Quaker...
Friends, Associates Jessie White Mario
While in the USA they met like-minded people, including Lucretia Mott and William Lloyd Garrison .
Daniels, Elizabeth Adams. Jessie White Mario: Risorgimento Revolutionary. Ohio University Press, 1972.
81
Friends, Associates Sojourner Truth
ST 's vocation brought her into contact with many eminent people, from Abraham Lincoln downwards. She shared a platform with Frederick Douglass on a famous occasion when she challenged his faith by demanding whether God...
Literary responses Lydia Maria Child
The volume was welcomed by William Lloyd Garrison in The Liberator, and was reviewed in the Athenæum in February 1857.
Clifford, Deborah Pickman. Crusader for Freedom. Beacon Press, 1992.
229, n17
The Athenaeum Index of Reviews and Reviewers: 1830-1870.
Literary responses Elizabeth Heyrick
The United States was more generous in its praise than England, or at any rate than London. Benjamin Lundy , William Lloyd Garrison , Frederick Douglass , and Lucretia Mott all admired her, and for...
politics Lydia Maria Child
LMC 's feminist ideas, though foreshadowed in her adolescent encounter with Milton, were slow to develop. When Frances Wright visited Boston in summer 1829 and gave a public lecture about women's rights, Child not only...
politics Harriet Martineau
HM formed links with the wing of the abolitionist movement led by William Lloyd Garrison , and made a fast friend in Maria Weston Chapman , a pivotal member of this movement. Long after her...
politics Emmeline Pankhurst
Its members included Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy , Jane Cobden , William Lloyd Garrison , Josephine Butler , and Mrs P. A. (Clementia) Taylor (convenor of the first Women's Suffrage Committee formed in London), among others.
Publishing Frances E. W. Harper
Tremendously successful, this collection reached its twentieth edition by 1871. The second of these editions contained an introduction by William Lloyd Garrison .
Boyd, Melba Joyce. Discarded Legacy. Wayne State University Press, 1994.
57
Sherman, Joan R. Invisible Poets. University of Illinois Press, 1974.
65
Reception Elizabeth Heyrick
EH 's posthumous fame was (and remains) greater in the USA than in Britain. William Lloyd Garrison praised her in a public speech given at Glasgow in 1840, several years after British abolition was achieved...
Textual Features Elizabeth Barrett Browning
This powerful evocation of a female African-American slave, who challenges her pursuers and thereby forestalls her capture moments before she dies, draws on EBB 's awareness of the Barrett family's history as Jamaican slaveholders. A...
Textual Features Sojourner Truth
Even the original text of the Narrative of Sojourner Truth is told in the third person, not the first, and uses the standard white, middle-class, abolitionist diction of sentiment. There is little sense of ST

Timeline

1 January 1831
William Lloyd Garrison launched his anti-slaveryjournalThe Liberator with a reference to Elizabeth Heyrick 's doctrine of immediate, not gradual abolition as the only impregnable position to assume.
14 July 1832
William Lloyd Garrison 's The Liberator announced the formation of the first Female Anti-Slavery Society in the USA, in Providence, Rhode Island.
June 1840
American women were refused entry as delegates to the first World Anti-Slavery Convention held in London.
1856
British abolitionist Julia Griffiths , a supporter of Frederick Douglass , toured England and Scotland founding women's auxiliaries.