F. R. Leavis

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Standard Name: Leavis, F. R.
Used Form: Frank Raymond Leavis

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Cultural formation Q. D. Leavis
QDL lived all of her life in London and Cambridge. Herself of Jewish, Polish, and German heritage, she was intensely concerned with English writers, readers, and notions of Englishness. She had a lasting...
Cultural formation Q. D. Leavis
At this time Queenie was a member of the JewishStudents' Society . She ate kosher food sent from home, and with her friend Sophie Baron , she attended services at the Thompson's Lane synagogue. Her...
Education Maggie Gee
MG gives a very funny account of being interviewed for a place at Cambridge by Queenie Leavis , whose name she did not recognise, and talking confidently about Keats in ignorance of the way F. R. Leavis
Education Angela Carter
She said later that she chose medieval literature because she wanted freedom from the dictates of F. R. Leavis , freedom to read the modernists without developing critical ideas about them.
Gamble, Sarah. Angela Carter. A Literary Life. Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
55
Family and Intimate relationships Q. D. Leavis
At the beginning of her last year as an undergraduate, Queenie Roth (later QDL ) met her future husband, Cambridge don and critic F. R. Leavis , at a Girton College tea.
MacKillop, Ian. F.R. Leavis: A Life in Criticism. Allen Lane, 1995.
100
Family and Intimate relationships Q. D. Leavis
Q. D. Roth and F. R. Leavis were married, having been engaged since February of this year. Their first of several homes, christened The Criticastery, was in Leys Road, Cambridge.
MacKillop, Ian. F.R. Leavis: A Life in Criticism. Allen Lane, 1995.
104, 107-8
Family and Intimate relationships Q. D. Leavis
QDL delivered her first child, a son named Ralph . She and F. R. Leavis had two other children: Katharine Laura , born in September 1939, and Lawrence Robin , born in December 1944.
MacKillop, Ian. F.R. Leavis: A Life in Criticism. Allen Lane, 1995.
152, 222
Family and Intimate relationships Q. D. Leavis
F. R. Leavis continued to be productive until his eighty-second year, when he began to experience black-outs. Despite her own fragile health, QDL was her husband's primary caregiver (with some help from their daughter Kate)...
Family and Intimate relationships Q. D. Leavis
F. R. Leavis , husband of QDL , died after nearly fifty years of marriage and nearly a year of suffering from black-outs, exhaustion and sad loss of reason.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
under F. R. Leavis
Friends, Associates Q. D. Leavis
Two of her contemporaries as undergraduates were Muriel Bradbrook (at Girton) and William Empson (whom her future husband, F. R. Leavis , came to admire especially).
MacKillop, Ian. F.R. Leavis: A Life in Criticism. Allen Lane, 1995.
85-6, 100
Instructor Elizabeth Jenkins
Then, during the years 1924-7, EJ studied at Newnham College, Cambridge . She realised the value of this education at the time, but not so profoundly as she did later.
Jenkins, Elizabeth. The View from Downshire Hill. Michael Johnson, 2004.
18
She received her BA...
Instructor A. S. Byatt
At Cambridge she was influenced by F. R. Leavis .
Kelly, Kathleen Coyne. A.S. Byatt. Twayne, 1996.
4
He, she later said, was very proud of himself and sure that he was right and everybody else was wrong; but he was also...
Instructor Margaret Drabble
One of her teachers was F. R. Leavis .
Creighton, Joanne V. Margaret Drabble. Methuen, 1985.
25
She continued acting as an undergraduate, primarily in tragic roles.
Hattersley, Roy. “The Darling of Hampstead”. The Guardian, pp. 6 - 7.
6
At this time she hardly ever read a newspaper.
Drabble, Margaret. “1960s”. The Guardian, pp. Weekend 25 - 31.
28
Intertextuality and Influence Q. D. Leavis
This book was conceptualized as a sequel to the dissertation of her husband F. R. Leavis , completed in 1924, The Relationship of Journalism to Literature: Studied in the Rise and Earlier Development of the...
Literary responses Elizabeth Gaskell
Early twentieth-century critics represented EG as a thoroughly domestic and womanly woman—Lord David Cecil in Early Victorian Novelists described her as the typical Victorian woman: gentle, domestic, tactful, unintellectual, prone to tears, easily...

Timeline

May 1932
F. R. Leavis launched his criticalperiodicalScrutiny as a quarterly published at Cambridge; it ran until October 1953. His wife, Q. D. Leavis , was co-editor, though not named in the masthead.
By May 1952
Cambridge academic F. R. Leavis published his influential book of criticism The Common Pursuit.
October 1953
Scrutiny, the criticalperiodical published at Cambridge by F. R. Leavis (with his wife, Q. D. Leavis , as silent co-editor), published its final issue.
1 October 1954
In the Movement, a leading article in the Spectator, identified a newly sceptical and debunking tendency in modern British poetry, opposed to social hierarchy and cultural authority, including that of modernism.
May 1959
C. P. Snow gave the year's Rede Lecture at Cambridge University : The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution.