Daniel O'Connell

Standard Name: O'Connell, Daniel

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Cultural formation Rosina Bulwer Lytton, Baroness Lytton
Despite her Irish birth, she disliked and distanced herself from the Irish: Anna Maria Hall 's husband, Samuel Carter Hall , reported her saying that she needed to fumigate her dining-room after entertaining Daniel O'Connell
Intertextuality and Influence Catherine Gore
In an extraordinary passage near the end of the book, Cecil lists a number of people who might, if they could only work together, revolutionize the country.
Farrell, John P. “Toward a New History of Fiction: The Wolff Collection and the Example of Mrs. Gore”. The Library Chronicle of the University of Texas at Austin, pp. 28 -37.
36
The names he mentions include actual...
politics George Eliot
Mary Ann Evans (later GE ) attended a demonstration in Coventry which was part of Daniel O'Connell 's campaign in support of Irish Home Rule.
Karl, Frederick R. George Eliot: Voice of a Century. W.W. Norton, 1995.
76
politics Frances Sarah Hoey
It was shortly after this marriage that her lifelong Irish nationalism was awakened by a meeting with patriot leader Daniel O'Connell .
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
politics Eliza Lynn Linton
Eliza's interest in politics began when she was very young. Her biographer George Somes Layard writes that the first seeds of her early republicanism were sown in Eliza's mind by Daniel O'Connell 's appearances at...
politics Harriet Martineau
HM represents herself in her Autobiography as brokering the successful repeal of the Corn Laws which took place on 26 June 1846, by mediating between Robert Peel and Richard Cobden . Histories of the repeal...
politics Mary Russell Mitford
In politics MRM was known as a Foxite: that is, she supported the Whigs under Charles James Fox , the more progressive opposition to the government. On 17 June 1814 she attended an Abolitionist meeting...
politics Mary Russell Mitford
When she wrote of her hatred of Enclosure Bills, and her pleasure when some glorious obstinate bumpkin of the true John Bull breed
Mitford, Mary Russell. The Life of Mary Russell Mitford: Told by Herself in Letters To Her Friends. L’Estrange, Alfred Guy KinghamEditor , Harper and Brothers, 1870.
1: 342
stood up against a Lord of the Manor to oppose...
politics Sydney Owenson, Lady Morgan
When she settled with her husband in Dublin, Sydney Morgan became friendly with the United IrishmenHamilton Rowan and the nationalist lawyer John Philpot Curran . Her oppositional, liberty-loving opinions strengthened with her age. She...
Publishing Jane Francesca, Lady Wilde
The Nation published an anonymous review of a biography of Irish nationalist Daniel O'Connell by Jane Francesca Elgee (later JFLW ): she called for the overthrow of English rule in Ireland.
Thesing, William B., editor. Dictionary of Literary Biography 199. Gale Research, 1999.
199: 300
Textual Features Charlotte O'Conor Eccles
COCE opens by making two points which might seem at variance with each other: the fascination which the past holds for later generations, and their ignorance of its discomforts and inconvenience. In a note she...
Textual Features Antonia Fraser
This book is character-driven in AF 's accustomed manner, featuring Whig reformers, Tory reactionaries, and those dubbed revolutionaries like Daniel O'Connell and William Cobbett . Its story opens in November 1831 with a famous pronouncement...
Textual Features Elizabeth Grant
EG was not impressed by the large colony of British residents at Pau and found their company somewhat tiresome. An entry on 31 December 1843 captures her mood: We have left our own weeping climate...
Textual Features Sydney Owenson, Lady Morgan
One of this novel's topics is concealed identity (which results in repeated changes of name for several central characters). As the story opens, two men land at Dublin (which they find desolate, poverty-struck by the...
Textual Production Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington
She wrote the last two-thirds of the text between 4 and 31 March 1833.
Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington,. “Introduction”. Conversations of Lord Byron, edited by Ernest J. Lovell, Princeton University Press, 1969, pp. 3 - 114.
92
Blessington was ahead of the game with this novel depicting the defeat of the movement for repeal of the Act...

Timeline

12 August-3 September 1821
The newly-crowned George IV visited Ireland (the first British monarch to do so since William III made war there), and was rapturously received in Dublin.
1823
The Catholic Association was founded in Ireland; its leader was Daniel O'Connell .
5 July 1828
Daniel O'Connell was returned to parliament as member for County Clare.
13 April 1829
The Catholic Emancipation Act at last received the royal assent, allowing limited civil rights, for the first time, to Catholics in Britain.
22 April 1834
Daniel O'Connell introduced in the British Parliament debate on Repeal of the Union between Ireland and England.
14 November 1834
George Stephen told Anne Knight that women, banded together in Ladies' Societies, deserved most credit for the recent Abolition Act.
18 February 1835
Following a general election, Irish O'Connell ites, Whigs and Radicals formed an Opposition alliance at Lichfield House in London.
May 1836
Nicholas Wiseman (Rector of the English College at Rome) and Irish nationalist Daniel O'Connell began publishing the Dublin Review in London.
1839
Supporters of Daniel O'Connell broke up a Dublin meeting attended by Robert Lowery .
1840
Daniel O'Connell proposed an Irish parliament of 300 members, and embarked on a serious campaign for repeal of the Union between England and Ireland which had come into force on 1 January 1801.
1843
A planned mass meeting of Irish nationalists, headed by Daniel O'Connell , was banned by the British government; O'Connell acquiesced, and the repeal movement was effectively silenced.
May 1844
Irish Catholic barrister Daniel O'Connell was tried and found guilty of conspiracy against British rule and incitement to violence. Although he was sentenced to one year in prison with fines, the verdict was reversed four...
15 May 1847
The death of Daniel O'Connell (in Genoa in the course of a pilgrimage to Rome for his failing health) left Irish politics in disarray.