Sarah Tytler

-
Standard Name: Tytler, Sarah
Birth Name: Henrietta Gibb Keddie
Pseudonym: The Author of the Kinnears
Pseudonym: Sarah Tytler
Henrietta Keddie, who wrote under the pen name ST , was a prolific Scottish author who aimed at a predominantly female audience. Over her nearly sixty-year publishing career she produced more than one novel a year, with a total somewhere over 75 but under 100. Her books rarely ran to more than one edition. Writing in the vein of domestic realism, she often employed historical and often Scottish settings. She summed up her own literary output as consisting of a good many novels, historical and present-day stories for girls, historical sketches . . . [and several lives] of remarkable women.
Tytler, Sarah. Three Generations. J. Murray, 1911.
344
British Library Catalogue.
Solo: Search Oxford University Libraries Online.

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Anthologization Susanna Blamire
Sarah Tytler (pseudonym of Henrietta Keddie) and J. L. Watson included work by SB in The Songstresses of Scotland, saying that she wrote Scotch songs like a Scotchwoman.
Kushigian, Nancy, and Stephen C. Behrendt, editors. Scottish Women Poets of the Romantic Period.
The Athenaeum Index of Reviews and Reviewers: 1830-1870.
2280 (8 July 1871): 44-6
Cultural formation Isabella Bird
IB apparently told Sarah Tytler , however, that they were also motivated by interest in, and a desire to join, the Free Kirk which had recently separated from the Church of Scotland .
Tytler, Sarah. Three Generations. J. Murray, 1911.
267-8
Friends, Associates Dora Greenwell
Among DG 's other writer friends were Elizabeth Charles , Margaret Hunt , and Sarah Tytler .
Marsh, Jan. Christina Rossetti: A Writer’s Life. Viking, 1995.
297-8, 429
Bett, Henry. Dora Greenwell. Epworth Press, 1950.
18-20, 22
Gray, Janet. “Dora Greenwell’s Commonplace Book”. Princeton University Library Chronicle, No. 1, pp. 47 -4.
50, 51
Gray, Janet. “The Sewing Contest: Christina Rossetti and the Other Women”. A/B: Auto/Biography Studies, No. 2, pp. 233 - 57.
240
Hickok, Kathleen. Representations of Women: Nineteenth-Century British Women’s Poetry. Greenwood Press, 1984.
215
She was also acquainted with Longfellow , William Bell Scott
Friends, Associates Isabella Bird
Sarah Tytler (whose name by birth was Henrietta Keddie) and John Stuart and Eliza Blackie were among IB 's circle of friends in Edinburgh.
Literary responses Alison Cockburn
Her literary image has been entwined with that of Scotland's romantic history and landscape. Sarah Tytler (Henrietta Keddie) and Jean L. Watson in The Songstresses of Scotland, 1871, delighted in the idea of her...
Literary responses Sarah Williams
Plumptre likens SW to the essayist Elia, that is, to Charles Lamb .
Plumptre, Edward Hayes, and Sarah Williams. “Memoir”. Twilight Hours: A Legacy of Verse, Strahan, 1868, p. vii - xxxiii.
xiii
Among those who admired her work were the Reverend F. D. Maurice and the Scottish author Henrietta Keddie (who wrote...
Occupation Constance Smedley
Since the Langham Place Group had provided a social space for women in 1860, several organizations had already challenged the flourishing institution of men's clubs. The Lyceum Club came on the scene at a time...
Residence Alison Cockburn
As a widow living in EdinburghAC was, according to Sarah Tytler and Jean L. Watson , a lively cultural influence, serving as a connecting-link between the Edinburgh of Allan Ramsay and Burns , and...
Residence Alison Cockburn
Alison Rutherford grew up in the Scottish Highlands, in the Forest of Ettrick, which as her Victorian biographers remark, is not a forest except in the sense of wilderness, since the hills are...

Timeline

12 March to 25 May 1644
In her husband 's absence the royalist Countess of Derby , born a Huguenot Frenchwoman, successfully stood a siege at Lathom House in Lancashire (a towered and moated building).
July 1889
Women's Suffrage: A Reply appeared in the Fortnightly Review to counter Mary Augusta Ward 's Appeal Against Female Suffrage in the previous month's Nineteenth Century.
1901
The publication of George Douglas Brown 's novel The House with the Green Shutters marked the first attack on the Scottish school of fiction that was afterwards known as Kailyard.