Susan Carlile

Standard Name: Carlile, Susan

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Literary responses Adelaide O'Keeffe
The Monthly Review was on the whole complimentary. It judged the novel to be original and entertaining, though it complained of a few Hibernicisms and grammatical errors. It concentrated, oddly, on the Don Zulvago plot...
Literary responses Charlotte Lennox
Seventeen years after the brief, inglorious appearance of The Sister, Sir John Burgoyne raided it for his successful comedy The Heiress, which opened at Drury Lane on 14 January 1786. Twenty years after...
Publishing Charlotte Lennox
Fifty items relating to CL (mostly letters addressed to her) survive in the Houghton Library , Harvard University . This collection was discovered in 1964 but took some years to reach scholarly notice.
Isles, Duncan. “The Lennox Collection”. Harvard Library Bulletin, No. 4, pp. 317 - 44.
317, 320-1
Publishing Charlotte Lennox
A second edition followed on 19 March 1761. It featured the first appearance of Lennox's name on a title-page, and a dedication (supplied by Johnson ; the first edition had none) to the Duchess of Newcastle
Reception Charlotte Lennox
Among modern scholars, Duncan Isles called this the fullest and probably most reliable biography, and Susan Carlile regrets that it has not been more used.
Carlile, Susan. “Expanding the Feminine: Reconsidering Charlotte Lennox’s Age and The Life of Harriot Stuart”. Eighteenth-Century Novel, edited by Albert J. Rivero and George Justice, pp. 103 - 37.
110
This year three magazines ran articles about CL (a...
Textual Production Charlotte Lennox
An anonymous translation from Voltaire , The Age of Lewis XIV, published by Dodsley , has been thought to be by CL ; her biographer Susan Carlile denies this.
Isles, Duncan. “The Lennox Collection”. Harvard Library Bulletin, No. 4, pp. 317 - 44.
326
Carlile, Susan. Charlotte Lennox. An Independent Mind. University of Toronto Press, 2018.
156n69
Textual Production Charlotte Lennox
She had written most of it by November 1751. With Johnson as mediator, she consulted Richardson about revisions, denouement, optimum length (she reduced her plan from three volumes to two), and about her choice of...

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