Harriet Lee

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Standard Name: Lee, Harriet
Birth Name: Harriet Lee
HL , Romantic-period novelist and dramatist, is remembered primarily for the fiction collection Canterbury Tales, in which her sister Sophia shared.

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Education Mary Russell Mitford
MRM was said to have learned to read by the time she was three. In January 1806 she got through fifty-five volumes, including books by Sarah Harriet Burney , Maria Edgeworth , Elizabeth Hamilton ,...
Family and Intimate relationships Sophia Lee
Anna Lee, youngest sister of Sophia and Harriet , hanged herself from the top railing of her bed, and died.
Highfill, Philip H., Kalman A. Burnim, and Edward A. Langhans. A Biographical Dictionary of Actors, Actresses, Musicians, Dancers, Managers and Other Stage Personnel in London, 1660-1800. Southern Illinois University Press, 1993.
Family and Intimate relationships Sophia Lee
SL had one elder and two younger sisters. One of them, Harriet , became a playwright and novelist like herself.
Friends, Associates Hester Lynch Piozzi
While visiting Bath, HLP met Sophia and Harriet Lee .
Clifford, James L. Hester Lynch Piozzi (Mrs Thrale). Clarendon Press, 1987.
312
Friends, Associates Anna Maria Porter
There they are reported as being neighbours and friends of another pair of literary sisters, Sophia and Harriet Lee .
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
under Harriet Lee
Friends, Associates Charlotte Smith
CS and Sarah Rose developed a highly personal epistolary relationship from January 1804, though they never met. Sarah's husband, Samuel Rose , was a solicitor involved in attempts to settle the Smith trust. The Roses...
Friends, Associates Sophia Lee
A bluestocking-style brilliant Constellation
Norton, Rictor. Mistress of Udolpho: The Life of Ann Radcliffe. Leicester University Press, 1999.
185
of ladies, gathered at the Leesisters ' house in Bath, debated the authorship of Plays on the Passions, which were not yet known to be by Joanna Baillie .
Norton, Rictor. Mistress of Udolpho: The Life of Ann Radcliffe. Leicester University Press, 1999.
185
Instructor Ann Radcliffe
It is often said that AR attended the school run by Sophia and Harriet Lee and their sisters (of whom she was later a friend or acquaintance) in Bath. But no evidence supports the...
Intertextuality and Influence Clara Reeve
It seems that CR 's outline of her abandoned plan for linked tales dealing with national character was an inspiration for Harriet Lee 's similar design in her Canterbury Tales. Apart from this, Reeve's...
Intertextuality and Influence Mary Lamb
M. B.'s purpose in story-telling is not moral improvement but making little girls feel better (the youngest is seven): cheering them up since, newly sent to boarding school, they are crying for home; alleviating their...
Intertextuality and Influence Agnes Strickland
Her historical romance The Pilgrims of Walsingham, 1835, is written on the Canterbury Tales model (as practised originally by Chaucer and more recently by Harriet Lee and her sister ). AS 's pilgrims who...
Occupation Sophia Lee
Sophia , Harriet , and Anna Lee retired from their school at the end of the 1802-3 school year.
Lee, Sophia. “Introduction”. The Recess, edited by April Alliston, University Press of Kentucky, 2000, p. ix - lii.
xxxiv
Textual Features Charlotte Smith
CS sets her tales in France just after massacre of St Bartolomew's Eve on 24 August 1572, in the Lake District, in modern Jamaica, and modern Austria-Hungary, somewhat in the manner of...
Textual Features Sophia Lee
An Advertisement claims that The Recess is a version, in modernised English, of a manuscript memoir from the reign of Elizabeth I . It breaks new ground for the English novel in various ways: it...
Textual Features Marguerite de Navarre
Whereas Boccaccio 's tale-tellers had retired to a country house while the plague raged in town, and those in Chaucer 's Canterbury Tales were on pilgrimage, Marguerite de Navarre 's travellers are stranded at an...

Timeline

June 1793
An enterprising printer and freemason, John Wharlton Bunney , put out the first number of The Free-Mason's Magazine, or General and Complete Library.
By 22 July 1797
William Beckford published a second and more marked burlesque attack on women's writing: Azemia: A Descriptive and Sentimental Novel. Interspersed with Pieces of Poetry.