Engelbert Dollfuss

Standard Name: Dollfuss, Engelbert

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Literary Setting Rose Allatini
In the first of these, RA reverted to an early practice of writing about recent, and threatening, international politics. Waters' Meet opens with Philippa Langford, nearly forty, good-naturedly escorting (as stand-in for a glamorous and...
politics Naomi Mitchison
Her next political fact-finding trip was the one to Vienna undertaken after the violence inflicted by the Fascist Dollfuss government in February 1934.
Mitchison, Naomi. You May Well Ask: A Memoir 1920-1940. Gollancz, 1979.
187-8, 191, 193-5
Benton, Jill. Naomi Mitchison: A Biography. Pandora, 1992.
84-5, 97-9

Timeline

Mid-February 1934
Martial law was declared in Vienna following Nazi terrorist incidents, a demonstration of peasants in support of the coalition government of Engelbert Dollfuss , and the taking up of arms by Socialists.
25 July 1934
In the words of The Times, the courageous little Chancellor of Austria, Engelbert Dollfuss , died of wounds sustained during a raid on his residence by Nazi terrorists in a bid to overthrow the government.