Diane Purkiss

Standard Name: Purkiss, Diane

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Anthologization Lady Jane Lumley
The next year, a modern scholarly edition of LJL 's work appeared, as The Tragedie of Iphigeneia, in Three Tragedies by Renaissance Women, edited by Diane Purkiss together with plays by the Countess of Pembroke
Literary responses Hannah Wolley
Historian Diane Purkiss observes that this and HW 's later books open up privileged knowledge to unprivileged readers.
Purkiss, Diane. The English Civil War, A People’s History. Harper Perennial, 2007.
348
Literary responses Lady Jane Lumley
Scholar Marion Wynne-Davies has pointed out that what have been called errors in translation (omissions, transpositions) are deliberate changes made for literary or intellectual effect. Editor Purkiss provides a detailed analysis in her introduction.
Wynne-Davies, Marion. “Families at War: Womenapos;s Dramatic Writing and Political Conflict”. Disrupting the Discourses: Women Writers 1500-1700 Conference, South Bank University, London.
Mary Sidney Herbert, Countess of Pembroke, and Elizabeth Cary, Viscountess Falkland. “Introduction”. Three Tragedies by Renaissance Women, edited by Diane Purkiss, translated by. Lady Jane Lumley, Penguin, 1998, p. i - xlvi.
Literary responses Mary Renault
The book came out five years after the Sexual Offences Act in Britain decriminalised many homosexual practices there, and three years after the Stonewall Inn Riots in New York marked the start of Gay Liberation...
names Mary Sidney Herbert, Countess of Pembroke
There is no writer whose names are more problematic. For centuries she was traditionally known as the Countess of Pembroke (perhaps because this full form appears in the title of her brother's Arcadia) instead...
Occupation Hannah Wolley
According to her own statement she spent seven years (up to the age of twenty-four) as a servant to an employer in the nobility. Scholar John Considine in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography identifies...

Timeline

27 March 1625
James I (James VI of Scotland) died, and his son Charles I assumed the throne.
24 January 1642
The earliest dated of the weekly newsbooks listed in the English Short Title Catalogue is the issue for the twentyfourth of January to the last, 1641 [sic], of A Perfect Diurnall of the Passages in...