Mary Neal

Standard Name: Neal, Mary

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Friends, Associates Constance Lytton
Mary Neal , a leader in the folk-dance revival and joint founder with Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence of the Esperance Club for working girls, invited CL to holiday with herself and some of the girls in autumn...
Occupation Mary Augusta Ward
While it provided adult education and recreational programmes for the working classes, its greatest achievements involved helping children, especially those of the poor. A children's playroom had been started at Marchmont Hall in 1894 by...
Occupation Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
Emmeline Pethick (later EPL ) left the Working Girls' Club of the West London Mission with her colleague Mary Neal to establish their own settlement: the Espérance Working Girls' Club (or the Espérance Social Guild) .
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Brittain, Vera. Pethick-Lawrence: A Portrait. George Allen and Unwin, 1963.
27-8
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. “Working Girls’ Clubs”. University and Social Settlements, edited by Will Reason, Methuen, 1898.
Occupation Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
Emmeline Pethick (later EPL ) and Mary Neal turned their settlement for working girls into a co-operative dressmaking business, which they called the Maison Espérance . This settlement was based in Wigmore Street.
Brittain, Vera. Pethick-Lawrence: A Portrait. George Allen and Unwin, 1963.
27-8
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. My Part in a Changing World. Hyperion, 1976.
118
Occupation Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
Hugh Price Hughes , his wife Katherine Price Hughes , and Mark Guy Pearse had founded the Mission and the Club in 1887. The Club (or Sisterhood) provided practical and social support for working-class and...
politics Constance Lytton
In searching for a worthy cause to which to give her money, CL was activated by a feeling that modern improvements like free compulsory education and elected local government bodies had urban roots and were...
Residence Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
Emmeline Pethick and Mary Neal took a flat in Somerset Terrace, near Euston Road. This flat became the first home of their working girls' settlement.
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. My Part in a Changing World. Hyperion, 1976.
113
Pethick-Lawrence, Emmeline. “Working Girls’ Clubs”. University and Social Settlements, edited by Will Reason, Methuen, 1898.
Textual Features Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
EPL 's essay, which details the evolution of her working girls' settlement, Maison Espérance (first opened in 1897), begins by defining and describing the working girl. The working girl, it says, is brutally honest, loyal...
Textual Production Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence
At first the journal appeared monthly for threepence an issue, but within six months it began appearing weekly for a penny an issue. Its circulation reached 30,000 by 1909, and much of its profits came...

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