Harold Monro

Standard Name: Monro, Harold

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Friends, Associates Charlotte Mew
CM attended a Poetry Bookshop reading in Bloomsbury at the invitation of Alida Klementaski (later wife of Harold Monro ), who greatly admired her work.
Warner, Val. “New Light on Charlotte Mew”. PN Review, No. 1, pp. 43 - 7.
46
Monro, Alida, and Charlotte Mew. “Charlotte Mew—A Memoir”. Collected Poems of Charlotte Mew, Gerald Duckworth, 1953, p. vii - xx.
vii
Stanford, Donald E., editor. Dictionary of Literary Biography 19. Gale Research, 1983.
310
Literary responses May Sinclair
Harold Monro 's condemnation of After the Retreat as petty poetry whose reticence denotes either poverty of imagination or needlessly excessive restraint,
Raitt, Suzanne. May Sinclair: A Modern Victorian. Clarendon Press, 2000.
196
is part of a general opposition to Imagism.
Publishing Charlotte Mew
The printing firm usually employed by the Bookshop could not print the volume because one of their compositors, a Methodist, refused to set the poem Madeleine in Church, which he considered to be blasphemous...
Publishing Anna Wickham
AW initiated the pseudonym by which she is known when nine of her poems were published in Harold Monro 's journal Poetry and Drama.
Grant, Joy. Harold Monro and the Poetry Bookshop. Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1967.
120
Wickham, Anna, James Hepburn, and James Hepburn. “Fragment of an Autobiography: Prelude to a Spring Clean”. The Writings of Anna Wickham Free Woman and Poet, edited by Reginald Donald Smith, Virago Press, 1984, pp. 51 - 157.
102
Hepburn, James, Anna Wickham, and James Hepburn. “Anna Wickham: A Memoir”. The Writings of Anna Wickham, Free Woman and Poet, edited by Reginald Donald Smith, Virago Press, 1984, pp. 1 - 48.
18
Publishing Anna Wickham
Critic Joy Grant writes of AW 's relations with her editor, Harold Monro , in a positive light, stressing Wickham's gratitude to Monro for not seeing her poems as symptoms of a disordered mind
Grant, Joy. Harold Monro and the Poetry Bookshop. Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1967.
123
Reception Charlotte Mew
Alida Klementaski (later Monro) read the poem and was electrified
Monro, Alida, and Charlotte Mew. “Charlotte Mew—A Memoir”. Collected Poems of Charlotte Mew, Gerald Duckworth, 1953, p. vii - xx.
vii
by it. She immediately committed it to memory, and a couple of years later repeated it to Harold Monro , editor of the newly...
Reception Susan Miles
Her publishers at Persephone chart the progress of her reputation through an experience around the turn of the century related by Ian Hamilton . A train of thought about forgotten names in Johnson 's Lives...
Textual Features May Sinclair
Defending H.D. against Harold Monro 's criticism, MS insisted that the Imagist style was unique for sheer emotion, for clean-cut and perfect beauty.
Raitt, Suzanne. May Sinclair: A Modern Victorian. Clarendon Press, 2000.
196
Nevertheless, she hedged her bets by telling Charlotte Mew that her...
Textual Features Anna Wickham
AW frankly expresses her frustrations with domestic duties and the disillusionment of married life: By the sacrifice of myself I have attempted to serve three generations of men. I seem to have ruined them all...
Textual Production Penelope Fitzgerald
She planned to write something about Harold Monro and the Poetry Bookshop , which she felt to have been unfairly eclipsed by the much-heard-of Bloomsbury group.
Hill, Rosemary. “Making Do and Mending”. London Review of Books, No. 18, pp. 9 - 10.
9
She also worked on but did not...

Timeline

1 January 1913
Harold Monro opened the Poetry Bookshop at 35 Devonshire Street (now Boswell Street) in Bloomsbury.