Lucy Sussex

Standard Name: Sussex, Lucy

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Education Mary Fortune
The extent and nature of MF 's education is unknown, but her writing is sprinkled with Latin and French, and critic Lucy Sussex writes that she was adept at written English [and] sometimes used an...
Family and Intimate relationships Mary Fortune
Indeed, her whole motivation at this time is murky: though she apparently had a work-related reason, she may have been escaping from her marriage. Lorna Sage , following Lucy Sussex , suggested that MF was...
Literary responses Mary Fortune
Lucy Sussex describes The Bushranger's Autobiography as an action melodrama,
Sussex, Lucy, and Mary Fortune. “A Woman of Mystery”. The Detectives’ Album, Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, pp. 3 - 18.
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and compares it unfavourably with Marcus Clarke 's contemporaneous His Natural Life. While it contains some fine writing,
Sussex, Lucy, and Mary Fortune. “A Woman of Mystery”. The Detectives’ Album, Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, pp. 3 - 18.
14
she suggests it...
Literary responses Mary Fortune
Lucy Sussex describes Dora Carleton as a rather less polished but more intriguing work
Sussex, Lucy, Lucy Sussex, and Elizabeth Gibson. “Introduction”. Mary Helena Fortune ("Waif Wander" / "W.W."), c. 1833-1910: A Bibliography, Department of English, University of Queensland, 1998, pp. 1 - 11.
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than its predecessor, Bertha's Legacy.
Literary responses Mary Fortune
To critic Andrew ManghamThe White Maniac examplifies a Victorian fascination with the potential for violence and irrationality in female adolescents, and detection as sustain[ing] a number of social hierarchies through the actual and figurative...
Literary responses Mary Fortune
Lucy Sussex describes The Detective's Album as a somewhat mixed bag.
Sussex, Lucy, Lucy Sussex, and Elizabeth Gibson. “Introduction”. Mary Helena Fortune ("Waif Wander" / "W.W."), c. 1833-1910: A Bibliography, Department of English, University of Queensland, 1998, pp. 1 - 11.
10
Reception Mary Fortune
Recent editions and general knowledge of Fortune owe a great deal to the work of critic and novelist Lucy Sussex . Sussex was responsible for editing and introducing the collection The Fortunes of Mary Fortune...
Textual Production Mary Fortune
In publishing her poem Cooée in the The Australian Journal, MF first used her pseudonym Waif Wander.
Lucy Sussex uses the title Cooée in her bibliography of Fortune; a 1995 Mulini Press reprint...
Textual Production Mary Fortune
The Australian Journal carried MF 's The White Maniac: A Doctor's Tale, a far more sensational and macabre short story than My Lady Jane.
In his article on the story, Andrew Mangham states...
Textual Production Mary Fortune
MF , as W. W., contributed to The Australian Journal the first of The Detective's Album series of stories (later collected as a volume): The Red Room.
Lucy Sussex has collected stories by MF
Textual Production Mary Fortune
MF apparently began her literary career publishing poetry in local Australian newspapers. Her critic and biographer Lucy Sussex characterizes some of this poetry as politically radical.
Sussex, Lucy, Lucy Sussex, and Elizabeth Gibson. “Introduction”. Mary Helena Fortune ("Waif Wander" / "W.W."), c. 1833-1910: A Bibliography, Department of English, University of Queensland, 1998, pp. 1 - 11.
5
Textual Production Mary Fortune
MF never explicitly stated her reasons for choosing her pseudonym, although in her article How I Spent Christmas, 1869, she describes herself as both a waif
Fortune, Mary, and Judith Brett. The Fortunes of Mary Fortune. Sussex, LucyEditor , Penguin, 1989.
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and a lonely wanderer.
Fortune, Mary, and Judith Brett. The Fortunes of Mary Fortune. Sussex, LucyEditor , Penguin, 1989.
172
This...
Textual Production Mary Fortune
Although stories in Memoirs of an Australian Police Officer and Adventures of an Australian Mounted Trooper first appeared without attribution, a number of them were soon re-issued under his own name by James Skipp Borlase
Textual Production Mary Fortune
If MF is indeed the author of either The Stolen Specimens or Traces of Crime, then she is, Lucy Sussex argues, the earliest known female writer of detective fiction. Both stories pre-date the serialization...

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