Philip Dormer Stanhope, fourth Earl of Chesterfield

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Standard Name: Chesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope,,, fourth Earl of
Used Form: Lord Chesterfield

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Education Elinor Glyn
After Elinor Sutherland (later EG ) turned fourteen she no longer had a governess. Eager for intellectual stimulation, she took it upon herself to read everything in her stepfather 's book collection, which had recently...
Education Catherine Cookson
As a young adult CC took on her own education. With varying degrees of success she studied grammar, elocution, French, and the violin. She also discovered the public library. Colleagues at work got her to...
Family and Intimate relationships Harriette Wilson
A letter published in the English Spy in April 1825 alleged that HW 's paternal grandmother was Elizabeth Dubouchette , mistress of Lord Chesterfield , so that her father was half-brother of Philip Stanhope ...
Friends, Associates Jean Marishall
While in LondonJM was in touch with a long list of patrons or prospective patrons, including those eminent in both the social and literary worlds. The socially prominent included (as well as a colonel...
Intertextuality and Influence Sarah Pearson
The family attends the funeral of Mirabeau ;
Pearson, Susanna. The Medallion. G. G. and J. Robinson, 1794.
2: 89
they are still in France at the onset of the dreadful events of September 1793: the beginning of the Terror.
Pearson, Susanna. The Medallion. G. G. and J. Robinson, 1794.
3: 98
The medallion is...
Material Conditions of Writing Judith Cowper Madan
Her mother had died in 1727 and her father re-married the month before this poem. JCM had left her childhood home for good, and was staying with her husband's friend Lord Chesterfield , while awaiting...
Publishing Sarah, Lady Pennington
She appended her signature in the same form as before, S. Pennington, to her preface. The subscribers are a highly impressive collection in terms of social status; few writers subscribed and those, like Lord Chesterfield
Textual Features Catherine Cookson
Kate Hannigan opens with the birth of Kate's illegitimate child and flashes back to Kate's childhood on Tyneside, which is marked by violence and sexual abuse. Kate often lies in bed wishing to protect...
Textual Production Henrietta Camilla Jenkin
In 1844 HCJ , as the author of the Maid's Husband, published a two-volume translation of the memoirs of Jean François Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz , under the title Cardinal de Retz...
Textual Production Samuel Johnson
SJ addressed his famous epistolary snub to Lord Chesterfield , the arbiter of fashion and literature who had promised his patronage to Johnson's forthcoming Dictionary.
Johnson, Samuel. The Letters of Samuel Johnson. Redford, BruceEditor , Princeton University Press, 1994.
1: 94-7
Textual Production Jean Marishall
JM says the idea of writing a comedy was first suggested to her by Hope amid the disappointments that attended the appearance of her first novel.
Marishall, Jean. A Series of Letters. C. Elliot, 1788.
2: 195
Again she published allusively, as the Author...
Textual Production Catherine Cookson
She later described her instructions to herself for this book as, Forget about Chesterfield and Lords and Ladies and their big houses. Get rid of them. . . . Bring in Kate as you know...
Textual Production Catherine Cookson
In 1991, told that she might die at any time, CC instructed her husband to burn her manuscript notes, diaries, and letters, as well as the autobiography in progress.
Jones, Kathleen. Catherine Cookson: The Biography. Constable, 1999.
310-11
Her annotated copy of Lord Chesterfield
Theme or Topic Treated in Text Muriel Jaeger
MJ here relates the lives of five people who succeeded in living according to [c]oherent schemes of human behaviour, putting into practice their own theories of the good life. Cato (The Stoic) and George Sand...

Timeline

5 February 1737
The Opposition journalCommon Sense; or, The Englishman's Journal published its first number.
By November 1750
Robert Dodsley issued his successful work of homespun philosophy, The Oeconomy of Human Life, whose title-page announced it as translated from an Indian manuscript.
By April 1774
Lord Chesterfield 's Letters to his Son Philip Stanhope were posthumously published by his daughter-in-law Eugenia ; her omission of all material relating to herself gave rise to the story that he had not known...