Bryher

-
In considering the paucity of credit given to Bryher for her patronage of the influential Contact Press , critic Jayne Marek describes her as an invisible woman.
Marek, Jayne E. Women Editing Modernism: "Little" Magazines & Literary History. University Press of Kentucky, 1995.
116
Bryher is even less recognized as a writer than a patron: most of her texts are now out of print and have received little critical attention. Her novels, poems, memoirs, and criticism, together spanning much of the twentieth century, form a significant contribution to the development of Anglo-American modernism, particularly through their French and Imagist influences, and their explorations of topics including women's education, gender mutability, psychoanalysis, and film technology.

Milestones

2 September 1894
Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman) was born at Margate in Kent; she was her parents' elder child and only daughter.
Bryher,. The Heart to Artemis: A Writer’s Memoirs. Collins, 1963.
7, 118
Bryher,. “Introduction”. Bryher: Two Novels: Development; and, Two Selves, edited by Joanne Winning, University of Wisconsin Press, 2000, p. v - xli.
vi
Contemporary Authors. Gale Research, 1962.
104
January 1914
Using her birth name, Annie Winnifred Ellerman, Bryher released her first published text, a collection of poems entitled Region of Lutany.
Contemporary Authors. Gale Research, 1962.
104
July 1920
Development, Bryher 's first and most controversial novel, was published under the name of W. Bryher.
Contemporary Authors. Gale Research, 1962.
104
Bryher,. Development. Constable, 1920.
prelims
November 1972
Bryher 's last published work, The Days of Mars: A Memoir, 1940-1946, was issued.
British Books in Print. J. Whitaker and Sons, 1987.
1973
Contemporary Authors. Gale Research, 1962.
104
28 January 1983
Bryher died in Vaud, Switzerland, at the age of ninety.
Contemporary Authors. Gale Research, 1962.
108
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

Biography

In her memoir of 1962, Bryher writes emphatically of her desire to be referred to as Bryher, her chosen name: I took the name under Deed Poll, and under English law it is incorrect to speak of it as a pseudonym. My passport is issued to me under that name and no legal document is valid that I sign in any other way.
Bryher,. The Heart to Artemis: A Writer’s Memoirs. Collins, 1963.
193
The name was that of one of the smallest of the Isles of Scilly off Cornwall, a place that had a spiritual significance for her.
Bryher, and Amy Lowell. Bryher: Two Novels: Development; and, Two Selves. Winning, JoanneEditor , University of Wisconsin Press, 2000.
181

Birth and Background