John Maxwell

Standard Name: Maxwell, John

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Family and Intimate relationships Mary Elizabeth Braddon
MEB and her publisher John Maxwell were living together out of wedlock.
Wolff, Robert Lee. Sensational Victorian. Garland, 1979.
103
Family and Intimate relationships Mary Elizabeth Braddon
Newspapers spread, apparently at publisher John Maxwell 's behest, the story that he and MEB had recently married; this rumour was soon discredited when his wife's family publicly protested.
His wife's brother-in-law, Richard Brinsley Knowles
Family and Intimate relationships Mary Elizabeth Braddon
As soon after the death of his first wife as he was legally able, John Maxwell finally married MEB , after a thirteen-year common-law relationship.
Braddon, Mary Elizabeth. “Mary Elizabeth Braddon: A Brief Chronology”. Aurora Floyd, edited by Richard Nemesvari and Lisa Surridge, Broadview, 1998.
41
Wolff, Robert Lee. Sensational Victorian. Garland, 1979.
251
Family and Intimate relationships Mary Elizabeth Braddon
John Maxwell , publisher and husband of MEB , died of influenza.
Family and Intimate relationships Mary Elizabeth Braddon
While appearing on stage MEB must have found it a challenge to protect herself from unwanted sexual attentions. She attracted the attention, apparently without meeting disapproval from her mother, of newspaper proprietor Charles Bray (who...
Material Conditions of Writing Mary Elizabeth Braddon
The Welcome Guest (published by John Maxwell ) printed MEB 's now well-known ghost story The Cold Embrace, before she had taken up residence in London to live by writing.
Ashley, Mike. “Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Author of Lady Audley’s Secret”. Book and Magazine Collector, Diamond Publishing, pp. 78 -93.
81
Occupation Mary Elizabeth Braddon
Having several completed novels in hand, she was able to take it easy in the period following his death; her break from writing at this time was the first since the outset of her career...
Publishing Mary Elizabeth Braddon
Further early short fiction by MEB appeared in The Welcome Guest, a John Maxwell publication that sold for twopence and aimed at the educated working classes. My Daughters, which appeared on 20 October...
Publishing Mary Elizabeth Braddon
From late 1861 MEB published in her future husband John Maxwell 's Temple Bar, edited by George Augustus Sala , a periodical which aimed to compete with the prestigious Cornhill Magazine.
Wolff, Robert Lee. Sensational Victorian. Garland, 1979.
115-17
In...
Publishing Mary Elizabeth Braddon
A subplot excised in revision as Henry Dunbar was recycled into the short story Lost and Found: this removed the bigamy and blackmail from the novel. This time the novel in book form was...
Publishing Mary Elizabeth Braddon
Periodicals were vital to MEB 's career from the beginning. Having set out by regularly contributing sensational fiction to the Halfpenny Journal, she continued to provide articles in, for example, Punch and The World...
Publishing Mary Elizabeth Braddon
The full title was Lucius Davoren; or, Publicans and Sinners, and it too appeared as by the author of Lady Audley's Secret. This contract left her free to earn additional money for the...
Publishing Mary Elizabeth Braddon
Publisher John Maxwell launched the Halfpenny Journal to appeal to the educated working class. MEB wrote most of the material: seven or eight anonymous or pseudonymous novels over the next four years.
Wolff, Robert Lee. Sensational Victorian. Garland, 1979.
118-19
Reception Mary Elizabeth Braddon
After this bad beginning, the book garnered no critical attention until MEB revised and reissued it in 1861, after the publication of Lady Audley's Secret, as The Trail of the Serpent. Sales were...
Reception Mary Elizabeth Braddon
The same Gazette piece also drew attention to John Maxwell 's dubious advertising practices.
Wolff, Robert Lee. Sensational Victorian. Garland, 1979.
211
A minor scandal ensued in a number of journals, fuelled by a forged letter from MEB as editor, claiming ignorance...

Timeline

1843
John Maxwell founded his own publishing house in London.
December 1860
Following on the heels of the successful Cornhill Magazine, publisher John Maxwell created Temple Bar: A London Magazine for Town and Country Readers.
1875
Charles Reade dedicated his novelThe Wandering Heir to Mary Elizabeth Braddonas a slight mark of respect for her private virtues and public talents.
Wolff, Robert Lee. Sensational Victorian. Garland, 1979.
250
1876
John Maxwell sold Belgravia to Chatto and Windus , ending Mary Elizabeth Braddon 's association with the monthly.