Mary Waldron

Standard Name: Waldron, Mary

Connections

Connections Sort descending Author name Excerpt
Intertextuality and Influence Hannah More
The title-page quotation from Paradise Lost features the archangel Raphael's pronouncement that it is better for human beings to know That which before us lies in daily life than things remote.
Feminist Companion Archive.
According to critic...
Intertextuality and Influence Hannah More
Harriet Corp also responded, in 1817, with Coelebs Deceived, which opens with respectful critical dialogue about More's novel; but Corp's middle-aged protagonist finally decides to stay single. Mary Waldron suggests that Jane Austen 's...
Occupation Ann Yearsley
She said the business was a most promising one, and that she desperately needed the money for her children's support. Biographer Mary Waldron supposes that this work would have been quite incompatible with continuing to...
Occupation Mary Bryan
Though literary historian Mary Waldron says that MB took on the running of the business herself,
Waldron, Mary. Letter about Mary Bryan to Isobel Grundy.
Bryan later told her prospective patron, Sir Walter Scott , that her father took on its management for her...
Publishing Hannah More
It occurred to More that while there were already good books enough in the world for good people,
Jones, Mary Gwladys. Hannah More. Cambridge University Press.
193
the more numerous group of circulating-library readers were unprovided for. She therefore wrote (as she suggested...
Textual Features Ann Yearsley
AY 's biographer, Mary Waldron , argues that though willing to exploit the element of pathos in her circumstances in order to advance her sales or her reputation, she presented sorrow or suffering less as...
Textual Features Ann Yearsley
Waldron guesses that Hamilcar appealed to AY because she saw his leadership of the Carthaginians against the Romans in the First Punic War as courageous resistance against encroaching imperial tyranny.
Waldron, Mary. “A Different Kind of Patronage: Ann Yearsley’s Later Friends”. The Age of Johnson, edited by Paul J. Korshin and Jack Lynch, Vol.
13
, AMS Press, pp. 283-35.
333n41
Textual Production Ann Yearsley
Three more poems which she addressed to him this year are printed for the first time by Mary Waldron in A Different Kind of Patronage, 2002.
Waldron, Mary. “A Different Kind of Patronage: Ann Yearsley’s Later Friends”. The Age of Johnson, edited by Paul J. Korshin and Jack Lynch, Vol.
13
, AMS Press, pp. 283-35.
323-7

Timeline

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Texts

Waldron, Mary. “’This Muse-born Wonder’: The Occluded Voice of Ann Yearsley, Milkwoman and Poet of Clifton”. Women’s Poetry in the Enlightenment: The Making of a Canon, 1730-1820, edited by Isobel Armstrong and Virginia Blain, Macmillan, 1999, pp. 113-26.
Waldron, Mary. “’Werterism’ in Britain: The market value of suffering isolation”. British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (BSECS) Conference, Oxford.
Waldron, Mary. “A Different Kind of Patronage: Ann Yearsley’s Later Friends”. The Age of Johnson, edited by Paul J. Korshin and Jack Lynch, Vol.
13
, AMS Press, pp. 283-35.
Waldron, Mary, and Hannah More. “Introduction”. Coelebs in Search of a Wife, Thoemmes Press, 1995.
Waldron, Mary. Lactilla, Milkwoman of Clifton: The Life and Writings of Ann Yearsley, 1753-1806. University of Georgia Press, 1996.
Waldron, Mary. Letter about Mary Bryan to Isobel Grundy.
Waldron, Mary. “Mentors Old and New: Samuel Johnson and Hannah More”. New Rambler, pp. 29-37.