L. M. Montgomery

-
LMM is known around the world as the creator of the Anne of Green Gables books, an enormously popular series of novels written primarily for children about a red-headed girl growing up in Prince Edward Island, Canada. In addition to some novels aimed at a more adult audience, she also produced undistinguished poetry and some journalism. Her voluminous diaries have also attracted critical attention, and she maintained lengthy correspondences with friends Ephraim Weber and George MacMillan .
Black and white photograph of L. M. Montgomery, seated in a high-backed chair. Her hair is short, she has round, wire-rimmed glasses. and she looks straight at the camera. She is wearing a black dress with white detail on the collar and a white bow at the neck, a pearl necklace, and a white hat with a wide black riband. Her name is signed across the photo.
"L. M. Montgomery" Retrieved from https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1d/LMM_signed_photo.jpg. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication license. This work is in the public domain.

Milestones

30 November 1874
LMM was born in Clifton, Prince Edward Island, Canada, her parents' only child.
Rubio, Mary, and Elizabeth Waterston. Writing a Life: L.M. Montgomery. ECW Press, 1995.
13
1883
LMM began keeping a diary and started writing poetry at the age of nine.
Rubio, Mary, and Elizabeth Waterston. Writing a Life: L.M. Montgomery. ECW Press, 1995.
121
8 April 1907
LMM received notice from L. C. Page Co. of Boston that they wished to publish her novel for young adults entitled Anne of Green Gables; it was out by June of the following year.
Gillen, Mollie. The Wheel of Things. Fitzhenry and Whiteside, 1975.
69, 71
Rubio, Mary, and Elizabeth Waterston. Writing a Life: L.M. Montgomery. ECW Press, 1995.
123
24 April 1942
LMM died in Toronto, Ontario, where she had lived, largely unhappily, for seven years In September 2008 her grand-daughter reported the family belief that she took her life by means of a drug overdose.
Rubio, Mary, and Elizabeth Waterston. Writing a Life: L.M. Montgomery. ECW Press, 1995.
127
Butler, Kate Macdonald. “The heartbreaking truth about Anne’s creator”. The Globe and Mail, p. F1, F6.
F1, F6
Adams, James. “Lucy Maud suffered ’unbearable psychological pain’”. The Globe and Mail, p. A7.
A7

Biography

The author commented that, contrary to popular opinion, she never called herself Lucy Maud: my friends called me Maud and nothing else.
Gillen, Mollie. The Wheel of Things. Fitzhenry and Whiteside, 1975.
77
She also did not like her given name, I always liked Maud—spelled not with an e if you please—but I do not like it in connection with Montgomery.
Montgomery, L. M. The Selected Journals of L.M. Montgomery. Rubio, Mary and Elizabeth WaterstonEditors , Oxford University Press, 2004.
2: 67

Birth