Elizabeth Elstob

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EE is noteworthy as the first female scholar in the newly opening field of the Old English (or Anglo-Saxon) language. She was also a translator, a biographer, and a promoter of learning for women and of the study of women's history and culture: in short, a feminist.
Line engraving with portrait of Elizabeth Elstob inside an initial letter G, by Simon Gribelin, from "An English-Saxon Homily on the Birth-day of St. Gregory", 1709, which she translated from Old English. She looks towards the viewer, slightly angled to her left with her head turned to her right. She wears a dress with a low neckline, and her hair is styled with curls framing her forehead and face, while the rest hangs behind her shoulders.
"Elizabeth Elstob" Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Elizabeth_Elstob.jpg. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication license. This work is in the public domain.

Milestones

29 September 1683
EE was born at Newcastle, the youngest of eight children born in her family.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
1708
EE published An Essay upon Glory—translated, as the title-page explains, from the French of Madeleine de Scudéryby a Person of the Same Sex.
English Short Title Catalogue.
1715
EE published, together, her Rudiments of Grammar for the English-Saxon Tongue and An Apology for the Study of Northern Antiquities.
English Short Title Catalogue.
3 June 1756
EE died in her seventies, after nearly twenty years as a dependent of the Duchess of Portland .
Stephen, Sir Leslie, and Sidney Lee, editors. The Dictionary of National Biography. Smith, Elder, 1908.

Biography

Birth and Background

29 September 1683
EE was born at Newcastle, the youngest of eight children born in her family.
Matthew, Henry Colin Gray, Brian Harrison, and Lawrence Goldman, editors. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.