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Emmuska, Baroness Orczy entry: Overview screen.
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Overview
Writing
Life
Writing and Life
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Emmuska, Baroness Orczy, a best-selling novelist of the early twentieth century, is best-known for The Scarlet Pimpernel, her romance of aristocrats during the French Revolution. This was a play before it was a novel, and according to its author provoked a polarised response, with ecstatic audiences and fiercely disapproving critics. Apart from almost a dozen Scarlet Pimpernel sequels, she published many other historical romances, a few thrillers with modern settings, one historial biography, and her memoirs. Her short stories include a pioneering volume about a woman detective, who, as an amateur relying on her intelligence, intuition, and feminine guile, regularly out-performs her male professional associates.
Milestones
23 September 1865 Emma, Baroness Orczy, was born at her grandparents' home, the huge, rambling, square, commodious and ugly family country house of Tarnaƶrs on the Hungarian puszta, seventy-five or so kilometres west of Budapest. Bibliographic Citation link.  scholarly note link.
Friday 13 May 1903 A stage version of Emma, Baroness Orczy's The Scarlet Pimpernel (written by herself and her husband) was accepted for production by Fred Terry and his wife Julia Neilson to follow the successful Sweet Nell of Old Drury. Bibliographic Citation link.
Early 1905 EBO's The Scarlet Pimpernel (about heroic English aristocrats led by Sir Percy Blakeney rescuing their French counterparts during the revolutionary Terror) won instant success as a novel after a shaky debut on stage. Bibliographic Citation link.
By 21 November 1940 The stage version of EBO's The Scarlet Pimpernel, written by herself and her husband, Montagu Barstow, opened in London, where despite war and bombing it was highly popular with audiences. Bibliographic Citation link.
12 November 1947 Emma, Baroness Orczy, died at Brown's Hotel in London of kidney failure. Bibliographic Citation link.
By 22 November 1947 In the year that Emma, Baroness Orczy, died there appeared her autobiography, Links in the Chain of Life, which she had begun writing in 1938, before the war. Bibliographic Citation link.
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